Winchester District Outing – Saturday 27th October

Dear All,
I have finally got the towers for our outing a fortnight this coming Saturday worked out … and they are a little different from my original list, as two of the towers (Faringdon and Wantage) couldn’t accommodate us, for various reasons.
So the list is
Ashbury (Anticlockwise 6) 10.00-10.45 a.m.
Longcot (8) 11.30 a.m.-12.15 p.m.
Uffington (6) 2.00-2.45 p.m.
Letcombe Regis (6) 3.50-4.35 p.m.
Childrey (GF 8) 4.50-5.35 p.m.
So, none of the rings are very heavy, and we have an anticlockwise ring and a ground-floor ring among them.
The Captain at Longcot has kindly offered us mid-morning rfreshments – hence the 3/4-hour gap between the first and second towers, and I’m allowing an hour and a half for lunch at the Fox and Hounds in Uffington, and time afterwards for some afternoon tea. I allowed for the afternoon tea at this point as so many tea-rooms seem to shut at 4.00 on a Saturday.
For the architecture entusiasts Uffington is listed as three stars in Simon Jenkins’ 1000 best churches – for its austere and lofty Early English architecture, and Childrey is rated one star, for the font, the monuments and the brasses.
So, we have a ten o’clock start and finish just after 5.30, travel about an hour each way (from Winchester) so pretty easy-going.
I’ve attached the poster and pub menus, so please put the word round, and let Jenny know your lunch choices – preferably by Monday week, which gives you time to decide.
Hope to see lots of you on the day,
Best wishes till then,
District Secretary

Ringers Write-up of Plain Hunt and Trebling to Doubles Methods course October 13th 2018

The Education Committee delivered a brilliant learning experience by organising a fantastic Plain Hunt and Trebling to doubles methods course on Saturday.

The day began by meeting at Oakley St. Leonards Centre, near Basingstoke, for coffee and an introductory tutorial presentation delivered by Sallie Ingram. The 15 learners were split into three groups (I was in the blue group) with each group having its own itinerary of two churches to visit, one in the morning and one in the afternoon with a lunch at a specified pub in between. Before we left for the first church we had to select our lunch choice from our allotted pub menu. This would be phoned through to the pub so that the day was as time efficient as possible.

Our Blue group of 5 learners and a few helpers then carshared and got to our first church at Sherborne St. John, meeting up with the rest of our cohort of helpers. I forgot to count but I think there was 5 learners and 7 or 8 helpers. Plenty. All experienced. All kind. Our lead(er) tutor was Mike Winterbourne who made sure that everybody got their fair share of learning, focused us on details of techniques and, of course, putting theory into practice.
In every learning environment, confidence has to be managed well. Mike and all the helpers were endlessly helpful and respectful of the challenges us learners faced and happily rang Plain Hunt all day with a purpose.
Our group had lunch at The Vine, Hannington on a long table reserved for us in their conservatory, the odd pint being had to offset the heat of the sun room and take advantage of the car sharing!
With lunch and a few unplanned puddings eaten, we moved to the afternoon’s tower of ringing, Wolverton.
Us five learners carried on learning to hunt inside, trying different bells in different places. My highlight was ringing on bell 4, and pulling of in tittums, me being in second place. Never done that before! And then hunting a bit and ending, surprisingly, back in the same place I started!
I had an impromptu introduction to the mysterious world of Geocaching by one of our coaches, Paul, which was really interesting, before racing back to Oakley for a debrief of tea and cake to round off a brilliant day of ringing and learning.
Thanks to all involved in a terrific education day. Looking around at what other guilds do around the country, it seems that here in our patch of bellringing we’re really lucky that we have such a large collection of willing helpers, both front of stage and backstage.

Wolverton Church has two large circular windows which let in a decent amount of natural and directional light. I was too busy with my ringing to capitalise on this so I passed my camera to Isla Ingram, Andy and Sallie’s 12 year old daughter to make a photo record of the session as she was having a break from ringing. I set the camera to Shutter Priority 80th/sec, gave her a brief driving lesson on some of the buttons and off she went. She did a super job.
As bellringers, we spend an enormous amount of our leisure time in a pursuit that rarely gets represented in documentary form through photography. Peal boards and Bellboard are all well and good but hardly represent the everyday physical and emotional effort that we put into the art nor the pleasure we get out of it. How can we share this easily to non-ringers? Will our families be able to flick or click through albums and reminisce over images of us, vibrant and engaged in our hobby of choice? Pictures are worth thousands of words. To make those pictures you need light. Flash is too obtrusive and most ringing chambers are too dimly lit even for modern smartphones to capture images worth sharing. Hence the lack of photos. If you’re wondering what to get your ringing chamber for Christmas, how about a nice large window? Or maybe just some nice big lightbulbs?

Thanks to those windows and thanks to Isla’s photography we have some great photos that show the work of the Education Committee and all the helpers, and I’ve got photos of those who have taught me to ring. I’ll be looking at those pictures in years to come, always able to put the face to the name.

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Written by Gary Marsh
Photography by Isla Ingram

C&S Beyond Bob Doubles at Sopley on Wed 7th November

This will be our last practice before Christmas (there’s a concert in the church in December) – so a bit of  Christmas Party fun, with everyone able to choose something from the repertoire we’ve practised this year.  Anything on the variations schedule (methods and variations) is possible, plus splicing plain courses, splicing touches, bob minor (we’ve some different touches to try out) – and don’t forget Stedman.
It would help if you could let me know what you’d like to try, so a programme can be drawn up, and please let me know if you’re able to come along.
Could be a great evening’s entertainment.
Hope to see you then,

PETERSFIELD RINGERS WW1 100 YRS COMMEMORATION RINGING

CENTENARY – WORLD WAR I 1914-1919

PETERSFIELD CHURCH BELL RINGERS REMEMBER THE LOCAL FALLEN

As we remember those who died over 100 years ago in the Great War on the 100th anniversary of the signing of The Armistice that ended it, we will also be remembering those ringers who fought and were fortunate enough to return home at the end of the war.

Petersfield bell ringers from St Peter’s church will be remembering those who died listed on the High Street War Memorial by ringing each evening for 11 minutes on each of the ten evenings leading up to Remembrance Sunday on 11th November this year. On each evening 11 named fallen servicemen will be remembered beginning on 1st November with 11 serving men who died aged between 17 and 20 years old. On other evenings groups of 11 fallen individuals from the Royal Flying Corps, Royal Navy, Army, Marines and Merchant Navy will be remembered as well as the theatres they died in.

We will also be remembering those who fought and returned home, often injured or mentally scared. Petersfield ringers have identified and researched details of three veteran servicemen who rang before and after the war at St. Peters.

Archibald John GARRET

Archie went to war aged 31 leaving at home his widowed mother and two sisters at 1 Osbourne Road, Petersfield. He served as a Sergeant with a Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery in France. The battery would have consisted of 182 officers and men, 87 horses and would have been equipped with four 6-inch Howitzers capable of firing 100-pound shells up to 6,000 yards. In recognition of his distinguished service and gallantry Archie was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal (MSM) as well as  the Victory Medal. On 28th June 1919 Archie is recorded as ringing a quarter peel at St. Peters to celebrate the signing of the Peace Treaty. Archibald died aged 74 in 1959.

Henry MELLS

Henry, a painter and plumber, joined up in March 1917 aged 30 and served as Company Sergeant Major in the Hampshire Regiment and then the Wiltshire Regiment in France on the Western Front. Henry’s parents, Henry and Jane MELLS lived at 14 Swan Street, Petersfield together with Henry and three other children including his younger brother Frank (below). Henry was part of the band of eight ringing the bells at St Peter’s in June 1919 to celebrate the signing of the Peace Treaty. Henry died aged 75 in 1962.

Frank MELLS

Frank, Henry’s younger brother, was a Brewery Cellarman and served as a Private (Acting Sergeant) in the Hampshire Regiment. Frank was awarded a Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) for gallantry in the field aged 30 whilst serving in Mesopotamia at Resht (modern day Iran). On June 28th 1919 Frank rang the bells at St Peter’s with his brother Henry and Archie Garrett to celebrate the signing of the Peace Treaty. Frank died aged 73 in 1973.

The Petersfield ringers would be very interested to find out from any family of the above who can provide additional information on these three men who fought and returned from the Great War or those listed on the War Memorial who sadly did not. Contact Malcolm Wigmore  Tel: 077 88 576 853.

A&P Striking Competition results and a report from our Chairman

Alton and Petersfield District Striking Competition

Held at Our Lady of Warnford

Saturday 6th October 2018

The weather wasn’t great, especially as the week had been so unseasonably warm.  It was cold, wet and windy but this didn’t dampen the spirits of those taking part in this year’s competition.  Six teams entered and for those learners who came along to listen to the ringing we also put together a scratch team so that they could experience what it was like to be in a competition.  We had teams entered from Alton, Blackmoor, Bramshott, Buriton, and a combined Froxfield and West Meon team.  Alton entered two teams one to ring Call Changes and one to ring a method.  Unfortunately, on the day, Bramshott had to withdraw leaving five teams to battle it out.  To quote our adjudicator, everyone did very well because these bells were not the easiest to ring.  The results were as follows;

In 5th place Blackmoor. Unfortunately none of the team was able to attend the meeting but well done to you all.

In 4th place West Meon / Froxfield.

From left to right, holding their certificate, Theresa Brown (Froxfield) and Edwin Grimshaw (West Meon).

Striking Competition 2018

In 3rd place Buriton.

Holding the certificate for the team is David Hughes.

2018 Striking Competition

In 2nd place and winner of the Call Changes section Alton.

From left to right Penny Rehbein, Matt Watts (back), Emma Hornsby, Sam Marriott and Julia Day.

Awards Striking Competition 2018

In 1st place, overall winner and winner of the Method section, Alton.

From left to right Mike Novell, Steve Marriott, Andy Sparling, Liz South, David Sluter and Jess Hornsby.

2018 Competition Striking Competition

Our adjudicator for the day was Roger Barber who was assisted by Andrew Banks and I would like to thank them both for doing such an excellent job.

Note: The Scratch Team only has the competition experience and is not counted in the place order or awards but well done to those who took part.  We hope to see you in future competition bands.

Mike Novell

District Chairman

Ringing Cancelled: Ringwood Service Ringing, Sunday 7th October 2018

There wil be no service ringing at Ringwood on Sunday 7th October 2018, due to a shortage of numbers this week.

Why not head to and visit a different tower and help out a fellow band, such as the heavy ring of 8 St. Peter’s Bournemouth, or a very light 6 at Sacred Heart.  Do check the online calendar for notices before your journey though.

Taylor’s Bellfoundry secures National Lottery Support!

The Loughborough Bellfoundry Trust has received initial National Lottery support* for the restoration of the historic Taylor’s Bellfoundry in Loughborough it was announced on Tuesday 2nd October.

Made possible by National Lottery players, the project aims to restore key parts of the Grade II* listed building which is currently on the Historic England Heritage at Risk Register. The aim is to restore the buildings, enhance the commercial operation, attract more visitors and increase awareness and understanding of the importance of Taylor’s

Development funding of £298,600 has been awarded by the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) to help the Loughborough Bellfoundry Trust progress the plans. This is the first phase in a bid for £3.7 million from the HLF, which it is proposed will be matched with funding from a number of sources including a fund raising campaign which will be launched shortly. Subject to a successful second round bid, work is expected to start on the Bellfoundry in 2020.

There will be a wide range of opportunities for people to be involved with the project at the Bellfoundry, including heritage craft workshops, volunteering and arts and cultural events.

Taylor’s is the last bellfoundry in Britain, the only vestige of an ancient industry that creates bells for thousands of buildings around the world. At least 20 million people in Britain and hundreds of millions worldwide will hear a Taylor bell every day.

However, the purpose-built Victorian bellfoundry is At Risk. Without urgent repairs and fundamental changes to engagement, we will lose this incredible asset and part of our culture; a massive loss to traditional craftmanship and a seismic impact on historic buildings around the world.

This project will; save the site, removing it from the HAR register, secure the future of the industry in Britain and its unique skills, create a National Bell Museum, improve global engagement and ensure Taylor bells are enjoyed by future generations across the globe.

Commenting on the award, Andrew Wilby, a Trustee of the Loughborough Bellfoundry Trust said “ We are delighted that we have received this support, thanks to National Lottery players. We are looking forward to developing our proposals further to save this national gem, securing the future of bellfounding in the UK and underpinning the future of the English Art of Change-Ringing across the world.”

If you would like to support the project please follow our facebook page or twitter feed (Twitter: @Lborobelltrust, Facebook: facebook.com/lborobelltrust).

-Ends-

Notes to editors

About the Heritage Lottery Fund
* HLF heritage grant applications are assessed in two rounds. Taylor’s Bellfoundry has initially been granted round one development funding of £298,600 by the Heritage Lottery Fund, allowing it to progress with its plans. Detailed proposals are then considered by HLF at second round, where a final decision is made on the full funding award of £3.7m.

Thanks to National Lottery players, we invest money to help people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect the heritage they care about – from the archaeology under our feet to the historic parks and buildings we love, from precious memories and collections to rare wildlife. http://www.hlf.org.uk. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and use #NationalLottery and #HLFsupported.

What is the Loughborough Bellfoundry Trust and why was it been set up?

The Loughborough Bellfoundry Trust is a Charitable Incorporated Organisation, registered with the Charity Commission in 2016. It was set up by a number of the John Taylor’s & Co directors to safeguard the future of bell making at the site in Loughborough in perpetuity. The unique collection of buildings, equipment, patterns, machinery and archives from the Bellfoundry have been transferred into the charitable trust to ensure their long-term protection for the nation.

Why are the buildings so special?

The earliest buildings that make up Taylors Bell Foundry date from 1859 and have been developed and changed as the business grew and following a fire in 1891. They are Grade II* Listed and this means that they are in the top 8% most significant historic buildings in the UK from a total of around 400,000 Listed buildings (92% are Grade II Listed and 2.5% are Grade I). It is the only purpose built Victorian bell foundry in the UK and we are pretty sure, in the world, with many areas of interest in architectural and constructional detail.
The buildings are currently on the Historic England (HE) ‘Heritage At Risk Register’ which is a ‘programme which identifies those sites that are most at risk of being lost as a result of neglect, decay or inappropriate development’ (Historic England 2017). In the case of the bellfoundry, it falls within the ‘decay’ category. The Trust and John Taylor & Co have worked closely with HE to identify the most urgent repairs and have secured three HE grants to deliver a series of repairs over 2016, 2017 and 2018. Although these repairs have already had a positive impact on the buildings, further repair is required to ensure the building can be taken off the Heritage At Risk Register and given a new lease of life.

What is the ‘Saving the Last Major Bellfoundry in Britain’ project?

Building on the significant work that the directors at John Taylor’s have undertaken since acquiring the business in 2009 and the subsequent transfer of assets to the Trust, a long-term vision for the site has been developed in the form of the Saving the Last Major Bellfoundry in Britain project. The vision for the project is as follows:

Our vision is for the John Taylor Bellfoundry to become the global centre in the art of bell making and learning. The sound of Taylor bells can be heard all over the planet; our vision is to secure this legacy and make sure future generations on every continent can be brought together by A Ring of Taylor Bells.
The objectives of the project are:

1: Conservation: The project will secure the conservation and enhancement of the Grade II* Listed John Taylor Bellfoundry. It will sensitively repair the Victorian bellfoundry and protect its unique collection of artefacts and archive and facilitate the conservation of historic bells and bell-towers throughout the world.

2: Education: The project will advance education in the history and art of bell making and bell ringing for people of all ages and levels of experience. It will ensure that the unique skills that go into bellfounding are preserved by training future craftsmen and women and enable public access to the world’s most significant archive of bell material.

3: Bellfounding: The project will enable Taylors to become the preeminent centre for bell research, development and manufacturing. It will ensure that processes pioneered by Taylors over centuries are sustained whilst exploring how 21st century technology can add value to this timeless art.

4: Celebration: The project will excite unprecedented numbers of visitors to the site and engage them in its history. It will engage new audiences and help communities to celebrate the heritage of bells across the UK and around the world.

5: Resilience: The project will ensure that the bellfoundry is financially sustainable and maintained into the long-term, ensuring bellfounding in the UK continues for future generations.

How can I find out more or get involved?

For more information on the project as it progresses or to get involved please visit or follow the following links:

Twitter: @Lborobelltrust
Facebook: facebook.com/lborobelltrust
Contact details: Please contact either Kate Pinnock or Ross Ingham via office@inghampinnock.com

C&S District 12 Bell Practice Saturday 6th October 2018 Christchurch Priory 6-8pm

Please see attached poster for details and printing for your tower.

CS District October Practice Priory

October’s district practice is at Christchurch Priory, with the method of the month being various permutations of Erin.

There is a fairly long climb up to the ringing chamber, so you may like to allow yourself extra time to arrive, and settle upstairs!

All enquiries to Sallie Ingram

Cancellation: Bournemouth St. Peter’s Basic Bells Thursday 4th October 2018, 7:30pm

Dear St. Peter’s Thursday night ringers,

Due to a concert being held within the church, there will be no practice at St. Peter’s Bournemouth, on Thursday 4th October 2018 at 7:30pm.

The following Thursday (11th October), Tim Kettle will be away, but practice night will still go ahead.  Please let the tower secretary, Romy,  know whether or not you are able to attend.

Contact Romy Coldman

Method Monday at Sacred Heart Bournemouth 1st October 2018 6:00pm

Dear All,
Forgive the late notice, but this week has got away from me.
This Monday will be a Method Monday- methods will be treble Bob hunt and Cambridge Minor. It has also been suggested we follow the practice with pizza if people would like to join us?
See you Monday at 6:00pm.
Kim

Congratulations to Matthew Dancy – First Peal!

Huge congratulations to Matthew Dancy on ringing his first peal at Selborne today. Matthew only turned 14 last month and has been learning to ring at All Saints, Basingstoke, Newnham and more recently at Bishopstoke. In the peal where his Mum, Margaret and Grandpa, Ian making Matthew the third generation of the family to ring. Grandma Ann was on hand too for band photos but declined to ring in the attempt.

Matthew rang really well throughout and only gave a hint of a teenage smile as the peal cane round. Let’s see if he can beat Grandpa Ian’s total of over 3300 – a little way to go!

Matthew Dancy-First Peal-Basingstoke
20180923-MatthewDancy-FirstPeal

Guild Education – Surprise Minor – Sat 24th November – Shedfield

The last full-day course of 2018, will be Surprise Minor to be held on Saturday 24 November, based at Shedfield.     You will see that students will have a choice of Cambridge or London.

We hope this will appeal to lots of you who, perhaps, don’t always get the opportunity to try these methods in your own tower, and you may well have friends in other towers to whom this would appeal.

I have attached copies of the Poster giving full details, plus the application form (both Word and pdf versions – see links below) and these have already gone to your District Secretaries for onward transmission to your tower secretaries.   As always – any questions, please email me, or call 01962 886939.

Christine

For:  The Education Committee

Poster:  Word   PDF

Application Form:  Word  PDF

 

C&S Beyond Bob Doubles – Wed 3rd October – 7.30pm – Sopley

Hi all,
At this practice we will try out our new found skills at learning new methods by consolidating progress so far by attempting variations taken from a choice of Reverse Canterbury, Plain Bob, Grandsire, St Simons, St Martins and Winchendon Place.  The variations will be bobs and singles we know from ringing other methods – eg a wallflower single is a plain lead of All Saints. We will only be ringing known methods and known bobs/singles (so nothing extreme etc) but note that Reverse St Bartholomew plain course is Grandsire singles and bobs are plain bob.
The variations are set out in the charts which everyone should have – please let me know if you need copies.
Touches of Stedman could bring some light relief to the proceedings!
Please confirm you are intending to come so I can ensure we have a viable practice.
Looking forward to seeing you there
Tim

 

Blackmoor’s damp day out – a report

The weather was not so kind to us this year when the Blackmoor ringers and friends got together for our outing in the Sussex area, and a few of us got more than a little damp. Reminder to self – Take a coat next year!

We started at St. Margaret’s in Warnham with a lovely ring of 10 in an all wooden tower that creaked and groaned, but didn’t sway nearly as much as we expected it to. Jess was unsure to begin with whether she’d be able to get herself and the bump up the narrow spiral stairs, but I’m glad to say she did.

Then it was onto St. Nicholas in Itchingfield which only has 5 bells, but has equally narrow spiral stairs. It really makes you wonder about the apparent lack of thought that went in to the construction of some churches and bells towers. It’s almost as though they didn’t want anyone to actually get in to ring the bells. Especially when, having got to the top, you then have to duck under a pair of cross beams that your average 8 year old would probably hit their head on. Pity the poor steeple keeper who has to fish a set of steps out from behind the stairs and thread them through the gap, before squeezing  himself through a very small trap door in the ceiling. There was a sixth ‘bell’ in the tower, a flat wooden demonstration model fixed to the wall, that wasn’t in the least annoying when Andy tried to ring it alongside the real ones.

Next was St. Peter’s in Slinfold, an absolutely fabulous ring of 6 where the local ringers obviously like to start their learners very young. There was a baby gate leaning against the back wall, which could be fitted across the front of one of the deep recessed window ledges, so that small children could be safely ensconced behind it to make an early start on soaking up the very strange language that all ringers need to learn. Jess thought this was a great idea and has asked if one could be supplied in Alton, for after the baby is born. I’m glad to say that Carol, one of our more reluctant ringers of unknown bells, decided that these looked safe enough to have a go on, and more than once at that.

After a very acceptable pub lunch at the 6 Bells in Billingshurst we then walked across the road to St. Mary’s, where they have 8 bells and proper stairs! They also have a ringer who apparently dreams up new methods in his sleep and then comes to practice and teaches them to all the others. Their practice board is full of method names like ‘Iago the Parrot Place Doubles’ , ‘Coco the Cat Differentials’ and ‘Chips in the Pub’. We have asked for copies of the lines so that we can have a go ourselves. There was another of the flat wooden demonstration bells here, but it was up on a windowsill. Hurray.

Following this we had to wake the brain cells up again because Holy Trinity in Rudgwick is a backwards ring of 8, set on what looks like a purpose built mezanine, overlooking the body of the church. And, joy of joys, wide carpeted stairs! It took a little bit of getting used to ringing back to front, but I think we did pretty well.

Our outing finished at St. Nicholas in Alfold, a very nice ground floor ring of 6 where the bells are set above the font. Fortunately the ropes hang far enough away that there was no risk of grazed knuckles.

All in all it was a marvellous day that we were very happy to have shared with some of our friends from other towers. And a couple of other friends who just came along for the ride.

Thank you to everyone who came.

Valerie

Longstock’s Re-enactment of WW1 photo scene – 18th and 19th August

Hi all,

This video is also now available on our website here (for those who do not have social media who might like to see it):

https://www.big-ideas.org/longstocks-pioneering-women-ringers-in-world-war-one/

IWM let us share it on the basis that it was for non-commercial use and a subscription was not required for it to be viewed.

It is also available on:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/RingingRemembers/permalink/429029997620612/

And here on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Big_Ideas_Co/status/1042021216398307328

Best wishes,

Jamie

Jamie Singleton

Campaign
Coordinator

 Big Ideas

www.big-ideas.org

020 3011 5275

 

Tommy’s Travels in the Channel Islands

After spending time shut face down in an overhead locker, I finally arrived in the Channel Islands for the weekend of the CI District ADM.

Spent an interesting 48 minutes perched on a sweet tin while the bells of St Peter Port (Town Church) were Quarter Pealed

Guernsey, Channel Islands

St Peter Apostle and Martyr, (Town Church)

Friday, 7 September 2018 in 48m (21–1–12 in E)

1250 Cambridge Surprise Major

1 Sue Le Feuvre

2 Mike Winterbourne

3 Marjorie B Winter

4 Paul Lawrence

5 Peter J R Bevis

6 Stephen A Rossiter (C)

7 Tim Wainwright

8 Alan T Winter

1st treble bob on 8: 1; 1st Cambridge Major: 4

Remembering those lost from the Channel Islands on the centenary of WW1

 I then visited the WW1 Fallen list at the junction of High St and Berthelot Street;  although I had my picture took I don’t seem to show up much.

Tommy Travels CI 1Tommy Travels CI 2

Opposite the entrance to the Bell Tower of Town Church there is a plaque concerning the Wild Flowers of Flanders Fields, again I do not show up well.

I spent an enjoyable Saturday afternoon in Forest Church while the ringers warmed up for the Striking Competition.

I stayed through every teams attempt to ring well; I believe I encouraged the young to try their best.

I even coerced the Guild Master to put the Guild Badge of Office around the neck of some of the young ringers for their excellent performances.

All the Young ringers did themselves proud. I am sure the results will be on http://cibells.com shortly.

After the ADM I stayed in the Forest Church to watch further attempts to ring strange stuff; some was successful but reverse London Surprise Minor only lasted one lead. Although reverse Cambridge Surprise Minor (Superlative Surprise Minor) and reverse Stedman Doubles succeeded (they are a strange lot in the Channel Islands.) The young and older ringers rang some more usual methods with some of the young ringers pushing their boundaries and successfully achieving new goals.

I was then stuffed back in the box and flew back to the Mainland (face down again)

I think I’m travelling to Portsmouth on Monday, hope someone knows where I will be going next.

Mike Winterbourne

Guild Master

Guild says goodbye to Rosalind Martin

To all in Winchester and Portsmouth Guild of Bellringers,

We would like to inform folks that Rosalind Martin has stood down as web-master for the Guild’s website.

Rosalind has been at the forefront of such major change that it is impossible to mention all the areas.

The Herculean task of building our website and future proofing it has led to it becoming a site that has a reputation of excellence in the bell-ringing world.

Now that the building and refining has been achieved and Rosalind is largely living in Birmingham, she feels this is a good time to step away.

There is a plan being drawn up to spread Rosalind’s workload out to as many people as we can in the team but help is being sought by us from everyone reading this.

We need;
• Assistant Webmaster to support Andrew Glover who has taken over the role
• More News Coordinators in each district who can collect ringers’ stories, anecdotes, local news and ringing successes and play at being a new editor ~ Full support will be available

Ros, the Comms Team would like to acknowledge your sustained effort and skills as a website builder and Web-Master.

We know you will join us in wishing Ros all the very best and we look forward to continuing to ring with you.

Thank You

The Team. and Guild Master

Can you be a judge for our striking competition on October 6th?

We are holding the Alton & Petersfield District Striking Competition on October 6th at Warnford, but are having trouble finding someone who is available to be our Judge.

The draw will take place at 2.30pm, with the first team ringing at about 2.50pm. We usually have 5 or 6 teams entering so will probably be finished by 4.30pm.

If you are willing/available to be our judge it would be great, though by no means essential, if you could then comment on each performance before presenting the trophies. Whether this is done straight after the competition whilst we are still at Warnford or after 5.00pm, when we will be in Privett for tea and our Autumn Meeting is entirely up to you.

Please can you contact either myself or Roger Barber if you are able to help us.

Many thanks, Valerie

Report from Chimes and Chips Youth Tour

Chimes and Chips Youth Tour

On Saturday 15th September 15 under 18’s from the Winchester and Portsmouth Guild got together for a fun filled afternoon of ringing.

Firstly, we went to the Forest Edge bells which are a group of mini-ring bells in New Milton. Lots of people had never rung on a mini-ring before, but we quickly got the hang of the different ringing style and we were soon ringing Bob Minor perfectly.

Next, we went to Hordle, it was hard for a lot of people and the learners struggled a bit, but it got better as the practice went on.

Our last tower was Milford on sea, our home tower where everyone enjoyed the bells. A lot of people said that this was this was their favourite tower and we produced some good ringing.

After all the hard work, we went to the beach and had fish and chips and had fun playing in the sea some of us got soaked to the skin and others stayed dry.

Today was a fun tour because it wasn’t just that we made new friends, but it was because we had time after the ringing together. It was incredibly good to see some parents getting involved in their children’s hobby, it was even better that people who had travelled a long way having the best time.

Overall, we had an absolutely fantastic afternoon.

By Isla and Erin Ingram

W&P enter Essex Trophy 10-bell Striking Competition

The W+P entered a team for the Essex Trophy 10 bell striking competition this year, which took place last Saturday morning at Horsham. The test piece was a whole course of Yorkshire Surprise Royal. The band representing the Guild were;
Jimmy Hodkin, Christine Hill, Ali Hunt, Colin Butler, Ian Hunt, Tim Martin, Oliver Chaloner, Daniel Graham, Kristian Scudamore and Peter Hill.
Many thanks to the band who entered and represented our Guild this year.
We ended up placed 6th out of the 7 teams who had competed, however the standard was very high, and we produced a respectable piece of ringing despite our placing.
The judges comments were that we took some time to settle down, and small inconsistencies throughout the piece earned us our faults. However towards the end of the test piece we did produce some good sounding ringing which was much more settled. I think the nerves of the band, who hadn’t rung much together as a full band, combined with a ring of bells that were unforgiving, meant we didn’t settle as well as we could have which lead to a nervous piece of ringing overall. It has certainly given us a nice clear focus going forwards.
Regardless of where we placed, the band all had an enjoyable morning and enjoyed representing the Guild in this competition, and as I said initially we certainly produced a respectable piece of ringing overall.
I am happy to continue coordinating the W+P entry for the competition next year, unless anyone else is also interested then of course it could be formally decided at the AGM.
Assuming I continue – if anyone wants to get involved with the W+P band entry for next year please do let me know.
Kind Regards,
Southampton

Christchurch Priory: Service ringing cancellation, 16th September 2018

There will be no general service ringing before Evensong this Sunday (16th September 2018).  This is due to a pre-arranged quarter-peal that will be taking place, in place of usual service ringing.

The morning service ringing will take place as is usual.

This message has come from Rosemary Rogers

Contact Rosemary Rogers

A report from Roger following the Bramshott practice

Hi all,
Just a quick message to say that it was great to so many of you at Bramshott on Saturday, and that you had looked up your methods beforehand and during the practice.  Well done all!
The next  practises are due to take place on Saturday 13th October and Saturday 10th November, both 5.30-7.30pm. I am hoping that one of these will be a general 10 bell practice. I will let you know in the near future.
We have our District Striking Competition on Saturday 6th October 2.30pm at Warnford. I hope to see a good entry for this and don’t forget that you can join with another tower if you can’t field a team on your own.
Its about taking part and having fun, gaining some experience more than who wins, in fact I always say if you put a team in then your a winner regardless.
Cheers for now,
Roger

Winchester and Portsmouth Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers