Category Archives: WW1

Final call for WW1 performances to be included in the printed archives

Please send us your WW1 Centenary Commemoration performances, including Remembrance ringing, up until 30th November 2018 if you haven’t done so already. We’d like to include them in the printed volumes of the archives. We need them now, please…. ww1bells@aol.com

Thank you and well done everyone!

Cheers,

Guild PRO

***URGENT*** – WW1 Centenary Commemoration performances up to and including those rung on 30th November 2018

WW1 Centenary Commemoration performances up to and including those rung on 30th November 2018

1259 individual performances harvested to date!

Please:

– submit your performance details, including footnotes, to us urgently. This will give our team the best possible assistance in ensuring their inclusion in the printed volumes

– consider what was rung on Armistice 2018, including any references to Ringing Remembers ringers, those new and returning.

–  send the details direct to ww1bells@aol.com and

– remember to add them to the event on BellBoard, if appropriate, In which case, please include “Winchester & Portsmouth Diocesan Guild”.

We’d love to see every tower in our Guild recognised in the printed archives especially.

Performances post-30th November 2018 will be included in the digital archives.

Please be encouraged to ring more!

Thank you.

Viv Nobbs
WW1 Centenary Commemoration Team

“We remembered” – a message from the President of the Central Council of Church Bell Ringers

Last Sunday – Remembrance Sunday – we were called to “look to” and take part in a most momentous commemoration.  Being so intimately linked in to our local communities, it was no surprise that bellringers everywhere stepped forward to participate, collectively and individually, in such a solemn centenary.

And it is entirely right and fitting that bells gave voice to the deep and lasting emotions felt so widely at this time.  So many today owe so much to our forebears for the freedoms and liberties that we enjoy one hundred years on.  As bellringers, we are the “external choir” that calls out across time and space, giving tribute on this day for those who have gone before.  This is what we do, this is our calling, this is our service.

On behalf of the Central Council of Church Bell Ringers, I wish to thank all who participated in this historic event.  The Ringing Remembers campaign, promoted by the Central Council, has claimed some inspiring headlines – towers silent for many years have rung out once more; hundreds of bands have been augmented with new learners; tens of thousands of ringers mobilised to ring in thousands of towers – not just in the UK, but across the world; ringing featured strongly in local, national and international media; and the BellBoard website went into meltdown!

Our campaign sought to recruit 1400 new ringers, to symbolically replace those ringers who fell in the First World War.  At the most recent count, new ringer registrations for the recruitment campaign totalled 2792 – close to 200% of the original target.  The Council’s newly-stated mission is, among other things, “to promote an environment in which ringing can flourish”.  Last Sunday we witnessed what “flourish” looks like – more of that please.

Whilst it is impossible to thank all key individuals by name, I would like to pay a special tribute to Vicki Chapman – Ringing Remembers Project Coordinator, Colin Chapman – Coordinator’s “roadie”, Alan Regin – Steward of the CCCBR Rolls of Honour, Andrew Hall – developer and administrator of the Ringing Remembers web platform, and Bruce & Eileen Butler – who linked thousands of enquirers to guilds, districts and towers.  And there are so many others…

My thanks go also to all those who have come to ringing through this route – may you continue to develop in skill, and gain many happy years of fulfilment in your ringing.  And to that widespread army of ringing teachers who have risen to the challenge of training so many enthusiastic learners – well done!

Last Sunday was a day of reflection, a day of commemoration, a day of participation.  Bellringers everywhere were able to say – “I was there – I remembered”.

Christopher O’Mahony

Tommy in Winchester – 11th November 2018

Sunday 11 November 2018

Up early this morning, bit of a shock to the system, arrived at the Cathedral at 8:30am. A long climb to the Ringing Chamber (130 steps).

 

The bells are half -muffled; rounds on 14 to start. Stopped for a ringer’s service by the Ringers Memorial, a wreath was laid by the Guild Master and all the known names of the fallen ringers were read out with their Towers. A short but poignant service.

Further ringing including Grandsire Caters, Plain Hunt Cinques and Call Changes on 12 before the Service started in the Cathedral.

Tommy in Winchester 3

The muffles were being removed as I left, there will be some open ringing starting at 12:30pm this afternoon

Tommy in Tangley – 6th Nov 2018

I was picked up on Monday and although still in my box enjoyed my ride to Kingsclere Church and listened to the Andover District Practice night; there was a mixed bag of ringing.

After spending Tuesday morning in the car being moved about as this nice lady hoovered around me; I went to Tangley Church as saw one of the Ringers Remembered volunteers practice her handling skills, improving every time.

Tommy in Tangley

After a short break a team of ringers and visitors stayed in the church to listen to the ringing of 1918 changes in memory of all those lost during WW1 from the Pastrow Benefice which includes Hatherden, Penton Mewsey, Tangley and Weyhill; the names of those lost were displayed in the Tangley Church during the ringing. Tangley is the only church in the benefice with bells.

I was packed back in my box and taken to Ludgershall via the Old Bell and Crown at Hatherden.

I am hoping to be at the Ringers WW1 Memorial in Winchester Cathedral on 11th November 2018.

 

CCCBR – A message for change ringers everywhere

We Remember

This Sunday – Remembrance Sunday – we are called to “look to” and take part in a most momentous commemoration.  Being so intimately linked in to our local communities, it is no surprise that bellringers everywhere have stepped forward to participate, collectively and individually, in this solemn centenary.

And it is entirely right and fitting that bells give voice to the deep and lasting emotions felt so widely at this time.  So many today owe so much to our forbears for the freedoms and liberties that we enjoy one hundred years on.  As bellringers, we are the “external choir” that calls out across time and space, giving tribute on this day for those who have gone before.  This is what we do, this is our calling, this is our service.

This Sunday will be a day of reflection, a day of commemoration, a day of participation.  Thank you for your participation in this historic event. Bellringers everywhere will be able to say – “I was there – I remembered”.

  • Christopher O’Mahony

———————————–

I vow to thee, my country, all earthly things above
Entire and whole and perfect, the service of my love;
The love that asks no question, the love that stands the test,
That lays upon the altar the dearest and the best;
The love that never falters, the love that pays the price,
The love that makes undaunted the final sacrifice.

And there’s another country, I’ve heard of long ago,
Most dear to them that love her, most great to them that know;
We may not count her armies, we may not see her King;
Her fortress is a faithful heart, her pride is suffering;
And soul by soul and silently her shining bounds increase,
And her ways are ways of gentleness, and all her paths are peace.

———————————-

Lyrics:  Sir Cecil Spring  Rice

Music: Sir Gustav Holst

Bells on Radio Solent this weekend!

This is the latest we have from Tim Daykin at BBC Radio Solent re: Bells this weekend…

Tim Daykin is broadcasting live from Royal Victoria Country Park Chapel.

Hopefully there will be a clip from the ringing of 1918 Plain Bob Triples at New Alresford recently reported here and a talk-up about the national ringing. This will most likely be towards the end of the programme.

Francis Mitchell has kindly supplied information to Tim re: the Chapel and its bells.

“Yes, I opened the Chapel and ran Tower Tours with volunteers from the Friends Group for over 4 years until the Chapel closed for the recent refurbishment.

The Chapel tower holds a clock chime of 3 bells (Whitechapel 1862) which were hung dead and sounded by clock hammers. The largest is the half ton hour bell which also has an internal clapper to which a rope was attached so it could be sounded as a service bell. I eventually persuaded Hants County Council to get a rope reattached so the bell could be “rung” on Tower Tours, as it is now.”
Tim’s show is broadcast from 6-9am on Sunday

 

Message to all our “Ringing Remembers” Ringers

To all our “Ringing Remembers” ringers, we wish you well for Sunday. Wear those badges with pride, you deserve to, for sure!

Armistice 2018 will be very meaningful for all of us ringers and we’re pleased and honoured to have you join us for this special Commemoration ringing tribute for the nation. Thank you all for your hard work and personal commitment that was necessary to reach the stage of being able to participate in Armistice  2018 ringing.

Most likely, you will have spoken to David Mattingley or me when you were first introduced to our Guild, or our conversations might have been by email. We look forward to meeting you all in person in a ringing room in the not-too-distant future.

Meanwhile, best wishes once again for Sunday and please consider letting me know of your experiences of your WW1 Centenary Commemoration ringing on Sunday.

Thank you all and your tutors who have worked vey hard consistently to achieve amazing results.

Guild Public Relations Officer

Armistice Ringing – Message from Viv Nobbs – Guild PRO

Messages are coming in thanking ringers for their support as the nation commemorates the centenary of the end of the WW1.

We will all be very busy, and pleased to be so I’m sure,  on 11th November. Thank you to all ringers and local leaders who are working so very hard at this time. Ringers are arranging for as many towers as possible to be ringing out, ringing at more than one tower and helping out at Chiming Towers, too.

Let’s tell the world where we’ll be ringing and when, please, responding to good feedback we’re receiving from our communities.  This recently from a
Royal Naval Association Officer –
” I am sure many of my shipmates would like to come and hear the bells and, with publicity in local media, you will get a positive response from descendants of
The Royal Naval personnel who died in WW1, who will wish to know of the ringing”.

Towers spreading the word of our ringing is most effective so using Pew Sheets and
Notice Boards in our churches, advising the local newspapers and so on will be great. This very special occasion gives us a good opportunity to check our existing posters and leaflets. Are they in the best locations? They have a tendency to get out-of-date and rather dog-eared, so not looking inviting….let’s get the smart ones out on display for the many visitors to our churches!

There have been helpful guidelines for us for Armistice Day and many local initiatives, too. These links might be helpful still…

wpbells.org/clarification-of-armistice-ringing/

and the Ringing for Peace poster (can be adapted to suit)

wpbells.org/ringing-for-peace-document-poster/

As well as advising our communities before the Armistice Ringing, they’d like feedback  from us and we would, too, please.

We would very much like to use relevant details for our WW1 Centenary Commemoration Archives so, whether tower bells, hand bells, chiming, tolling, rounds, call changes, quarters or peals, we’d love for EVERY tower and EVERY ringer to be included and acknowledged.

Ideally then we need details of the ringing, ringers including Ringing Remembers new or returning ringers, and footnotes including if any bells had been specifically cast as  WW1 Memorial Bells. You can submit to us direct –  ww1bells@aol.com
and you may well have seen the special Ringing World BellBoard site –bb.ringingworld.co.uk/event.php?id=9128

Please feel free to get in touch if you would like further information and we hope that Armistice Ringing will be truly significant and very meaningful for us all.

Viv Nobbs
Public Relations Officer

Tel: 01983 530920

Email: wpprovcn@gmail.com

 

Report on commemorate ring that took place on 21 October 2018 for the Winchester District bell ringers who died in the Great War

As part of Ringing Remembers, eight Winchester District bell ringers rang a peal of 1918 changes of Bob Triples at St John the Baptist church, New Alresford on Sunday 21 October 2018. This ring was organised to commemorate the twelve bell ringers who died in the Winchester District in the Great War and were a loss to the community. The ringers together represented the towers who had lost a ringer.

The bell ringers were:

Roy Lemarachel rang for St Mary’s,  Bishopstoke and was the conductor

Rodney Skinner rang for St Nicholas, Bishops Sutton

John Croft as chairman of Winchester District rang for St Michael and All Angels, Cheriton

Elizabeth Johnson rang for St John the Baptist, New Alresford

Ann Lemarachel* rang for St Stephen’s, Sparsholt

Colin Cook rang for Winchester Cathedral

John Colliss rang for Winchester Cathedral

Gerry Cornick rang for Holy Trinity, Wonston

NewAlresford1918TrebleBob21-10-2018
*Jenny Watson was due to ring but was unwell so Ann LeMarechal kindly took her place.

Short video clip here

Ringers of Winchester District who were killed in the Great War

Bishopstoke, St Mary

  • Battery Sergeant Major Frederick William Hutchinson

Battery Sergeant Major Frederick William HutchinsonService number 352049, 71st  Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Mentioned in Despatches. He was killed in Battle of Cambrai on 30 November 1917, aged 37.  He is commemorated on the Cambrai War Memorial in Louverval, France. Born in Ireland in 1878 and married to Gertrude with one son Frederick. He worked as an electrician for the London and South Western Railway Company and lived at 29 Church Road, Bishopstoke.

F.W.Hutchinson photograph, April 1912.

Bishops Sutton, St Nicholas

  • Corporal Charles Henry Money
    Service number B/2165 3rd Battalion Rifle Brigade. Died on 7 November 1918 aged 33 years. Buried in Cross Roads Cemetery, Fontaine-Au-Bois, Nord, France, II. C. 23. Born in 1895 in Bishops Sutton to James Money (a yardman or stockman on farm) and Sarah Money of Sutton Manor Farm, Bishops Sutton.

Cheriton, St Michael and All Angels

  • Private Percy Holmes
    Service Number 22204, 1st Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment (formerly service number 23101, Hampshire Regiment). Died of wounds at home on 18 December 1916 aged 40 years and is buried in the churchyard. Born in Cheriton in 1876, son of Richard Holmes (a farmer) and Emily Holmes of Malt House Farm, Cheriton

New Alresford, St John the Baptist

  • Serjeant William Curtis DCM
    Service number 20623, 26th Field Coy, Royal Engineers. Died on 18 May 1918 aged 27 years. Buried in Cambrin Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, N. 50. Born in New Alresford in 1891 to Walter Curtis (a hire carter) and Frances Curtis, of Pound Hill, Alresford, and husband of Josephine Kate Curtis, of 10, Clifton Road, Maida Vale, London.
  • Private William Harold Jackson
    Service number 30212, 2nd /4th Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment. Enlisted in Winchester and died on 5 November 1917 aged 19 years en route to Egypt. He is commemorated on Chatsby Memorial in Egypt. Born in 1898 to William James Jackson (schoolmaster at Stourpaine School, Dorset) and Annie Jackson of Broad Street, Alresford.

 

Sparsholt, St Stephen

  • Rifleman William Henry Daniels
    Service number B/784, 7th Service Battalion Rifle Brigade. Died 13 August 1916 aged 25 years. No grave but his name is on Thiepval memorial Pier and Face 16 B and 16 C. Born in Houghton in 1891 and resident of village as agricultural labourer. Son of Frederick Daniells (a carpenter) and Mary and brother of Miss Hilda Daniels, of Sparsholt, Winchester.

 

Winchester Cathedral, Holy Trinity, SS Peter, Paul and Swithun

  • Aircraftsman William H. Chute (Billy)Aircraftsman William H. Chute (Billy)

Service number 25437 Royal Flying Corp. Enlisted on 11 April 1915 as a rigger and was promoted to air mechanic 3 by 1918. Died of injuries sustained in war in 1924 aged 32. Born in Winchester in 1892, grandparents were William H. Chute (a fellmonger’s assistant) and Jane Chute of 12 Lower Brook Street, Winchester.

  • Sergeant Charles H. Russell Jnr.Sergeant Charles H. Russell Jnr.

Service number 200016, 1st/4th Battalion Hampshire Regiment. Imprisoned after surrender of British Forces following siege of Kut-al-Amara in April 1916. Died a few days after the Armistice of influenza on 17 November 1918 aged 31 years. Buried in Haidar Pasha Cemetery, Turkey Reference I. H. 12. Born in Winchester in 1887 and son of Charles Russell (a carpenter rand cathedral ringer) and Emma Russell, of 76, Lower Brook Street, Winchester.

 

Wonston, Holy Trinity

  • Private Edwin George Hillary
    Service Number 10470, 2nd Battalion Hampshire Regiment. Enlisted in Winchester and died 13 August 1915 aged 25. Born in Micheldever in 1892 and resided and worked in Sutton Scotney as a gardener.  Son of Edwin Charles Hillary (a jobbing carpenter) and Alice Mary Hillary, of Hunton Mill, Sutton Scotney. Commemorated at Helles Memorial, Turkey Panel 125-134 or 223-226 228-229 & 328.

 

  • Private Victor Frederick Hillary
    Service Number 10477, 2nd Battalion Hampshire Regiment. Enlisted in Winchester and died 13 August 1915, aged 18 (age occasionally shown as 19) Born in 1898 in Hunton, Micheldever and resided in Sutton Scotney. Son of Edwin Charles Hillary (a jobbing carpenter) and Alice Mary Hillary, of Hunton Mill, Sutton Scotney. Commemorated at Helles Memorial, Turkey Panel 125-134 or 223-226 228-229 & 328.
  • William H. Brooks
  • Herbert H. Jerram

Born in 1898 to Albert W Jerram (a blacksmith) and Mary K Jerram, living at the Blacksmith’s shop, Wonston.

Brothers Edwin and Victor Hillary both died when H.M.T. “Royal Edward” was torpedoed after leaving Alexandria for the Gallipoli Peninsula with reinforcements for the Dardanelles.

 

PETERSFIELD RINGERS WW1 100 YRS COMMEMORATION RINGING

CENTENARY – WORLD WAR I 1914-1919

PETERSFIELD CHURCH BELL RINGERS REMEMBER THE LOCAL FALLEN

As we remember those who died over 100 years ago in the Great War on the 100th anniversary of the signing of The Armistice that ended it, we will also be remembering those ringers who fought and were fortunate enough to return home at the end of the war.

Petersfield bell ringers from St Peter’s church will be remembering those who died listed on the High Street War Memorial by ringing each evening for 11 minutes on each of the ten evenings leading up to Remembrance Sunday on 11th November this year. On each evening 11 named fallen servicemen will be remembered beginning on 1st November with 11 serving men who died aged between 17 and 20 years old. On other evenings groups of 11 fallen individuals from the Royal Flying Corps, Royal Navy, Army, Marines and Merchant Navy will be remembered as well as the theatres they died in.

We will also be remembering those who fought and returned home, often injured or mentally scared. Petersfield ringers have identified and researched details of three veteran servicemen who rang before and after the war at St. Peters.

Archibald John GARRET

Archie went to war aged 31 leaving at home his widowed mother and two sisters at 1 Osbourne Road, Petersfield. He served as a Sergeant with a Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery in France. The battery would have consisted of 182 officers and men, 87 horses and would have been equipped with four 6-inch Howitzers capable of firing 100-pound shells up to 6,000 yards. In recognition of his distinguished service and gallantry Archie was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal (MSM) as well as  the Victory Medal. On 28th June 1919 Archie is recorded as ringing a quarter peel at St. Peters to celebrate the signing of the Peace Treaty. Archibald died aged 74 in 1959.

Henry MELLS

Henry, a painter and plumber, joined up in March 1917 aged 30 and served as Company Sergeant Major in the Hampshire Regiment and then the Wiltshire Regiment in France on the Western Front. Henry’s parents, Henry and Jane MELLS lived at 14 Swan Street, Petersfield together with Henry and three other children including his younger brother Frank (below). Henry was part of the band of eight ringing the bells at St Peter’s in June 1919 to celebrate the signing of the Peace Treaty. Henry died aged 75 in 1962.

Frank MELLS

Frank, Henry’s younger brother, was a Brewery Cellarman and served as a Private (Acting Sergeant) in the Hampshire Regiment. Frank was awarded a Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) for gallantry in the field aged 30 whilst serving in Mesopotamia at Resht (modern day Iran). On June 28th 1919 Frank rang the bells at St Peter’s with his brother Henry and Archie Garrett to celebrate the signing of the Peace Treaty. Frank died aged 73 in 1973.

The Petersfield ringers would be very interested to find out from any family of the above who can provide additional information on these three men who fought and returned from the Great War or those listed on the War Memorial who sadly did not. Contact Malcolm Wigmore  Tel: 077 88 576 853.

Longstock’s Re-enactment of WW1 photo scene – 18th and 19th August

Hi all,

This video is also now available on our website here (for those who do not have social media who might like to see it):

https://www.big-ideas.org/longstocks-pioneering-women-ringers-in-world-war-one/

IWM let us share it on the basis that it was for non-commercial use and a subscription was not required for it to be viewed.

It is also available on:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/RingingRemembers/permalink/429029997620612/

And here on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Big_Ideas_Co/status/1042021216398307328

Best wishes,

Jamie

Jamie Singleton

Campaign
Coordinator

 Big Ideas

www.big-ideas.org

020 3011 5275

 

Tommy’s Travels in the Channel Islands

After spending time shut face down in an overhead locker, I finally arrived in the Channel Islands for the weekend of the CI District ADM.

Spent an interesting 48 minutes perched on a sweet tin while the bells of St Peter Port (Town Church) were Quarter Pealed

Guernsey, Channel Islands

St Peter Apostle and Martyr, (Town Church)

Friday, 7 September 2018 in 48m (21–1–12 in E)

1250 Cambridge Surprise Major

1 Sue Le Feuvre

2 Mike Winterbourne

3 Marjorie B Winter

4 Paul Lawrence

5 Peter J R Bevis

6 Stephen A Rossiter (C)

7 Tim Wainwright

8 Alan T Winter

1st treble bob on 8: 1; 1st Cambridge Major: 4

Remembering those lost from the Channel Islands on the centenary of WW1

 I then visited the WW1 Fallen list at the junction of High St and Berthelot Street;  although I had my picture took I don’t seem to show up much.

Tommy Travels CI 1Tommy Travels CI 2

Opposite the entrance to the Bell Tower of Town Church there is a plaque concerning the Wild Flowers of Flanders Fields, again I do not show up well.

I spent an enjoyable Saturday afternoon in Forest Church while the ringers warmed up for the Striking Competition.

I stayed through every teams attempt to ring well; I believe I encouraged the young to try their best.

I even coerced the Guild Master to put the Guild Badge of Office around the neck of some of the young ringers for their excellent performances.

All the Young ringers did themselves proud. I am sure the results will be on http://cibells.com shortly.

After the ADM I stayed in the Forest Church to watch further attempts to ring strange stuff; some was successful but reverse London Surprise Minor only lasted one lead. Although reverse Cambridge Surprise Minor (Superlative Surprise Minor) and reverse Stedman Doubles succeeded (they are a strange lot in the Channel Islands.) The young and older ringers rang some more usual methods with some of the young ringers pushing their boundaries and successfully achieving new goals.

I was then stuffed back in the box and flew back to the Mainland (face down again)

I think I’m travelling to Portsmouth on Monday, hope someone knows where I will be going next.

Mike Winterbourne

Guild Master

Tommy’s Travels in the Basingstoke District – Saturday 1st September 2018

Remembrance is often difficult without direct memories or those passed on through family. Men who died in war were young and so are a dead-end on their family tree diagram. Many were never fathers, grandfathers or great grandfathers with photos and prized possessions passed through the family to keep them alive in the hearts of future generations. Memories of them 100 years on are now faded in the family histories.
Taking Tommy on his travels made these brave soldiers more alive to us, as ringers we had an insight into a small aspect of their lives. We know the hard work, dedication, attention to detail and reliability needed to be part of a group of ringers; how team work is essential and that we are an extended family.
Five towers in our district lost ringers. At each tower we had open ringing on tower bells or handbells followed by a silence to remember and then tolling of the tenor for the age of the ringer.
Our tour started at Yateley where we remembered Lance Sergeant Charles Albert Butler, aged 21. Ringing included rounds, rounds and call changes Grandsire and Plain Bob triples. The Yateley Society put on a display on the village green just outside the church which encouraged the general public to come and find out about ringing and see the ringers in action.
Stratfield Saye is a lovely little church on the Stratfield Estate. No ringing is allowed on the bells as the tower is now too weak. However, the vicar took us up to see the bells and we were able to sound each individual bell with a hammer (an ‘interesting’ tuning of a ring of 5 bells).
Five ringers were lost from this church: Lance Corporal Joseph Binge (20); Private Thomas William Binge(22);Private Albert George Broadhurst (24); Sapper Charles Kersley (30) and Private John Robert Series ( age unknown so we tolled the tenor 26 times).
Standing where our lost Tommies would have stood in the ringing room looking at the same oak bracing beams, brick walls and circle of five ropes was a poignant moment. Probably this was the whole band that had perished and that these men had possibly all worked on the estate or in the village.
At the chancel crossing we rang handbells ,mainly rounds with each person having a single bell.
The vicars’ young grandson, as well as Mary Oliver who rang at St Michael’s in Basingstoke many years ago also joined in.
The churchyard has mature trees that certainly would have been growing 100 years ago giving us a further connection to the past. We all sat together between these trees and ate a picnic, then tolled the tenor handbell for each of lost from the ringing family.
Next stop was Bramley. Here the stone work of the tower window had disintegrated and so no ringing of the tower bells was allowed as masonry falling onto the ringers was a real possibility. Some Bramley ringers joined us and we rang handbells in memory of Private Alec William Symonds (21). Interestingly the plaque in the church ranked him as Corporal.
Deane is a tiny village to the west of Basingstoke. The church has structural problems so ringing is generally restricted to special occasions and individual pieces of ringing are limited to about ten minutes in duration. The order of the bells in some changes makes them a little tricky to strike at times as tower movement makes some of the bells drop.
Two ringers from the same family were lost from this band. I was given the privilege of tolling the tenor for the life of Private Alfred Kirby aged 25 (about the same age as my youngest, Greg, is now and who is also a ringer) . Also remembered was Private Frank Kirby (34)
Our last visit of the day was to Dummer to remember Rifleman Royston Bishop(24)
We had some lovely ringing on the 5 bells. We were very grateful to members of the Dummer band who provided us with much needed refreshments.
The clear statue of Tommy travelled with us those and stood amongst us at each tower and gave us an echo of our lost members.
Lynne Jordan

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos provided by Graham Sargent and Gary Marsh.
Videos provided by Gary Marsh.

Yateley Community event and Tommy’s Travels – Saturday 1st September

Yateley’s community event, alongside Tommy’s Travels on Saturday 1st September, will be making the headlines!

Further to the earlier post here.

Peter Tipton, author of ‘Yateley in the Great War’ has contacted us saying

” Yateley Society is a charity that encourages local residents to cherish their local heritage and aims to educate the wider community, too. Interfacing with the wider community is much more difficult to achieve so we are seizing the opportunity you have given us by your ringing the bells at 10.45 a.m. So we have to thank you, Martin Barnes and the Guild for giving us this opportunity. Everyone I have contacted about the bell ringing is very enthusiastic.

The only picture the Yateley Society has (shown here) shows men in 1928; many of them had served in WW1 ten year’s earlier, including the brother of Charles Butler, for whom the Guild is ringing on Saturday. ”

Look out for the Yateley Society’s gazebo on the Green outside the Dog & Partridge. Peter will have his laptop there to find the WW1 relatives of local people.

Viv Nobbs
Public Relations Officer

Yateley_Bellringers_1928

VJ Day firing at Froyle

Froyle has a wall in their tower where all important information was, and is, written. Whilst they may not have anything recorded there about WW1 ringing, they do have this record of the bells being fired in VJ Day in 1945. Only 3 ringers named though, perhaps they fired 2 bells each.

Also apparently, there is a record of snow in 1904, in June!!  Somewhat different to June of this year then.

Linda Bulpitt has assured me that they will be adding to the wall when they ring at 11.00am and 7.05pm on November 11th.

Basingstoke District WW1 day of ringing and remembering – Tommy on Tour – Saturday 1st September 2018

Please be reminded and invited to a day of marking the loss of local bellringers in the First World War across churches in the Basingstoke District of our W&P Guild.  Please take the time to view the itinerary and note that some churches will be participating through handbell ringing.

Whether a handbell ringer, full circle or both, your presence at any or all of the churches will be greatly valued, not least by your fellow ringers, but by all in the Guild as we continue to work towards a fitting remembrance of our fallen.

The day starts in Yateley and this below from the Yateley Society describes some hows and whys.

“Basingstoke District Bell Ringers will be ringing the bells at St Peter’s Yateley on Saturday 1st September at 10.45 to 11.30 to remember bellringer Lance Sgt Charles Albert Butler who was killed 14th Apr 1918. He was the son of the bailiff of Yateley Manor. Two other sons served in WW1 but survived.

The Guild of bellringers has a project to remember the lives of the bellringers who lost their lives in WW1. Their tour next Saturday will ring at 5 different towers where the Winchester Diocese lost bell ringers. The ringers will first visit Yateley then they will go on to Stratfield Saye, which lost 5 bell ringers, Bramley, Deane and Dummer.

Yateley Society members will join with the local branch of the British Legion and Yateley Town Council to explain to local shoppers why the bells are ringing, who they are ringing for, and where he lived.

Look out for the Society’s gazebo on the Green outside the Dog & Partridge.  Peter Tipton, author of ‘Yateley in the Great War’ will have his laptop there to find the WW1 relatives of local people.

Most residents of present-day Yateley were not born here so are unlikely to have had relations living in Yateley in WW1. But by finding their own relatives and building their LifeStory on IWM’s permanent digital memorial local people will be able to remember their own family members during the bellringing remembering Charles Butler of Yateley. Relatives we might might find on #LivesOfWW1 are not restricted to the British Isles. There are 7.6 million names on the IWM memorial from all over the old Empire. The men from India and Pakistan who served in Indian Regiments are included, as are the men who served with the Chinese Labour battalions.

The Society will also have a small display about Sgt Butler and the Yateley Bellringers before and after WW1. ‘Yateley in the Great War’, recently published by Pen & Sword Books, will also be available for those who have not yet purchased a copy.”

See poster here for more details of this event.

Report from the Ringing Remembers Event at Longstock on Sunday 19th August 2018

Please take the time to read the report by the Big Ideas team following the terrific event hosted by the band of St. Mary’s Church, Longstock on Sunday 19th August.

From my perspective as it was an exciting couple of hours watching Bryony Leyland and the camera operator interview and film for South Today. All those placed in front of the camera did a brilliant job telling their stories and it was a real pleasure hearing them. Sadly so much of it wasn’t aired, and what was broadcast that Sunday night is now no longer available to view. Unfortunately, due to licencing restrictions on the famous old photograph of the Longstock Ringers and Reverend Routh, the BBC could only make the clip available for 24hours.

Particular thanks go to Mary Saunders, Longstock Captain and ringer for over seven decades, the Routh family, the band who worked to make all feel welcome with tea, cake and pizza, and of course BBC South and Hampshire Chronicle and Daily Echo.

Big-ideas.org delivers community and education projects and is promoting Ringing Remembers at many levels. It was great to meet some of the team who travelled down from London for the event.

Please do read their report for the full story which can be found here https://www.big-ideas.org/longstocks-pioneering-women-ringers-in-world-war-one/

Gary Marsh, Wonston Tower and Guild Comms Team Member

 

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Ringing Remembers Events – Message from W&P Guild PRO Viv Nobbs

Please let me know if you have arranged any Ringing Remembers events, along with brief details of the event; ideally email me by Tuesday, 28th August, please. We’re preparing a “Ringing Remembers Events in The W. and P.” item, most likely for the Ringing World’s consideration.

I’ve had reports from Longstock and the Isle of Wight already.

If you are about to organise an event, please get in touch, especially if you need more promotional material.
Thank you.
Viv
Guild Public Relations Officer.

GUILD WW1 CENTENARY COMMEMORATION PROJECT – THE FINAL THREE MONTHS – A REQUEST TO ALL RINGERS

Printed volumes of the WW1 commemoration performances are to be presented at special services at our two cathedrals early next year and digital records will also become available.

Research is still ongoing but performances up until July this year are now available to view hereAt present this is a DRAFT archive only.

This database will form the basis of the final printed volumes for the archives, so you are invited to check details, especially those of your own performances or at your own tower. In order that we might create the best possible record for us all and to reduce the upcoming pressure of final checking before meeting the printer’s deadline,  please notify any errors or omissions in the text to wpbells as soon as possible (comments on formatting not needed at this stage).

As ringing for WW1 in this the centenary year will continue to take place until the end of November, please consider submitting any further performances for inclusion in the database to BellBoard as soon as practicable after the performance.

We are aware of ‘Miscellaneous Performances’ – other than quarter peals or peals – that might not be submitted to BellBoard. We value these performances greatly and we encourage their inclusion in these special archives.  Consequently we invite ringers to notify details to wpbells as soon as possible following the performance.

Isle of Wight Crematorium Open Day – Sat 18th August – 10am-4pm

The Isle of Wight Bell Ringers will be involved in a Isle of Wight Bereavement Services Open Day, includes Ringing Remembers Project and Remembering the five Island Bell Ringers killed in WW1.

The Council Bereavement Services on the Island is aiming to:
– dispel the myths of the cremation process and

– help folk with their bereavement journey.
Proceeds will be donated to the Isle of Wight hospice.

GUILD PRO IW Crem Open Day 18-8-18

Quarter peal at Eling commemorating Fred C. Crook, died 1917.

We rang this Quarter last Sunday, after a bit or research Ruth Jackson discovered that an Eling Ringer (not a Guild Member) died 101 years ago in WWI.

Winchester & Portsmouth Diocesan Guild
Eling, Hampshire

St Mary
Sunday, 15 July 2018 in 46m (11–3–4 in F♯)
1260 Grandsire Triples
1 Adrian MacKinnon
2 Mary Sterry
3 Polly Osborne
4 Stephen N Hough
5 Margaret Feneley
6 Colin J Butler
7 Alan D Elsmore (C)
8 Chas Caley
Commemorating the 101st Anniversary of the death of Eling ringer Fred C Crook. Fred Crook joined the Eling band in 1905. He died on 16th July 1917. He was a gunner in the Royal Field Artillery and is commemorated in the Amara War Cemetery in Iraq. In the 1911 census he was living in Jacobs Gutter Lane, Eling, and was a carpenter. The centenary was missed as Eling was not affiliated to the W & P at the time of his death and the details have recently come to light.
1st Quarter 8.