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ART Module 2F course in W&P – 2nd November 2019

Taking your ringers from rounds to plain hunt in easily manageable steps

ART Module 2

Many of those who responded to the recent Guild Education Committee survey talked about the difficulties of helping their ringers progress from ringing rounds through to ringing the treble to methods. This is one of the most challenging stages as the new ringer is ‘multi-tasking’ trying to acquire a number of new skills, all at the same time – listening and accurate striking, counting their place, varying the speed of the bell (the three speeds of ringing), ringing with an open handstroke lead, and acquiring ropesight. This is not easy, especially if you only have a limited number of experienced ringers in your band.

To help, we are offering a choice of two separate one day courses in the W&P area this autumn. These introduce teachers and tower captains to a range of exercises to try with an inexperienced band. The exercises are designed to develop each individual skill and ensure a smooth transition into ringing methods

  • Sat 28th September 2019    Bournemouth, St Peter
  • Sat 2nd November 2019       New Alresford, St John

The September course will be delivered by David Smith who writes the Education Column in the Ringing World, and Roger Booth. The courses will use material developed by the Association of Ringing Teachers (Course code M2F). You do not need to have attended a previous ART module to attend. The ART modules can be taken in any order. The modules are designed to help teachers deliver the Learning the Ropes scheme.

Joining the course

There is no compulsion to attend this course – there are many experienced teachers out there, and all are free to continue to teach. However even the most experienced teachers have found the course valuable in terms of introducing themselves to new ideas, and sharing their experience with others, especially if they learnt a long time ago! Much of the Learning the Ropes material is freely available to all, but to give your pupils access to the on-line content, issue (free) progress certificates, receive discounts on publications and for access to on-line teacher support material etc., you need to have attended one of the modules to learn about delivering the scheme.

After the course we will group teachers together in local groups or ‘hubs’ for mutual support and set up a series of ‘foundation skills’ practices where attendees can practice teaching using the exercises introduced. To find out more visit: http://ringingteachers.org/about/art-training-scheme

To book a place, visit: https://smartringer.org/public/daycourses/

Members of the Winchester & Portsmouth Guild may reclaim ART course fees up to £20 from the Guild’s Training and Development Fund (subject to availability of funds).  Applications should be made to the Guild Treasurer via the Guild’s website, https://wpbells.org/

Education Committee Header

Download a copy of this flyer here

Great War Memorial Booklet – Salisbury Diocesan Guild of Ringers

Salisbury Diocesan Guild of Ringers
Great War Memorial Booklet
Compiled by Robert Wellen

56 pages | Illustrated | £5.00
Publication Date: 1 May 2019. ISBN: 978-1-78972-194-2

This Booklet has been produced after five years of commemorations across the Guild marking the centenary of the Great War. It is fully illustrated throughout.
An original artwork created for the Guild by Westbury artist Helen Chester (www. helenchesterarts.co.uk), great granddaughter of Private Fred Kerley (killed 1914), pictured above, depicts the 89 known ringers from the Diocese who were killed in the war, against a backdrop of our cathedral and some of the churches where they rang. The front 15 ringers are actual likenesses, drawn from contemporary photographs. This picture is shown on the front cover of the Booklet.

Contents include: Guild Memorial and Cathedral Commemorations, Ringers from the Diocese who Died (biographical details and details of ringing commemorations), Towers and Branches, The „Ypres Bells‟, Other Commemorative Ringing and Events, Armistice Centenary and Post war. The Booklet also contains wartime extracts from Guild Reports and The Ringing World.
“For the first time, in this publication, you will have in one place information that previously stood separately. The impact of the whole is all the more moving. Guild members and those from beyond will value and appreciate this Booklet both now and in years to come”. Robert Wellen, Guild Master and compiler of the Booklet.
“Lest we forget, this history reminds us of real people and costly lives–people from our communities, our predecessors committed to ringing bells in towers where we now stand. It is good to know them by name and to recognise their significance for us today”. An extract from a Foreword to the Booklet by +Nicholas Holtam, Bishop of Salisbury and Patron of the Guild

Booklet Flyer Photo 1The pre-war (1912-13) Edington football team which has four of the ringers in it. From the left: back row (first) Leonard Drewett, (fourth) John Frederick Pike Lawes; middle row (fifth) William John Wheeler (3) and front row (second) Reginald Charles Rogers.
Picture: Central Council Rolls of Honour

Booklet Flyer Photo 2Cathedral Memorial Screen: “The work to the screen, designed by H.S. Rogers, FSA., FRIBA., and executed by R. Mowbray & Co Ltd, London and Oxford, was completed by the time of the 1931 Annual Meeting in Sherborne”. (contemporary picture provided by Neil Skelton).

Three of the 89 known ringers from the Diocese of Salisbury to have been killed in the war:
Left: Private Harold Butcher: Trowbridge. Died 04/06/1917, aged 27.
Picture: https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Butcher-2532

Middle: Lance Corporal William John Wheeler: Edington. Died 23/03/1918, aged 26.
Picture: Reproduced by permission Edington Priory Church.

Right: Gunner William Henry Hardiman: Bridport. Died 07/11/1917, aged 29. Picture: William Hardiman with his wife Emma, and sons Bertram and Leonard (recently discovered picture now hanging in Bridport ringing chamber). Central Council Rolls of Honour.

Principal Contact: Robert Wellen
E-mail: Guild Master – SDGR
Telephone: 01747 825131
Mobile: 07817 633584

HOW TO PRE-ORDER BEFORE 1 MAY 2019 OR ORDER AFTER USING THE WEBSITE: https://sdgr.org.uk/great-war-memorial-booklet/
For UK postal delivery, please complete the form below and click the submit button. We have used a form generated by Google to ensure security of your information. For international orders please email us at Guild Master – SDGR so we can advise you of shipping cost before you order.

HOW TO PAY
Please pay by Bank Transfer (Internet Banking or BACS)
Information added
PLEASE PUT YOUR ‘NAME/GWMB’ AS REFERENCE ON THE PAYMENT
The price is £5.00 a copy plus £1.50 contribution to p&p per copy. For example: 1 copy = £6.50, 2 copies = £13.00, 3 copies = £19.50 etc.

OTHER WAYS TO PRE-ORDER, ORDER OR PURCHASE
1. Send a cheque (payable to the Salisbury Diocesan Guild of Ringers) for the appropriate amount (as indicated above) along with your name, postal address and postcode and a contact telephone number or e-mail to Robert Wellen, 67 The Meadows, Gillingham, Dorset SP8 4SP.
2. After 1 May, purchase a copy from a Guild Officer at Guild events and Branch Business Meetings.

Notes:
All of any surplus made on the sale of this Booklet will be divided evenly between the Llewellyn Edwards Bell Restoration Fund (LEBRF) (Registered Charity No. 270529) and The Commonwealth War Graves Foundation (CWGF) (Registered Charity No. 1171947) (https://www.cwgc.org/support-us).

GDPR: all the information you provide will be stored securely and only used for the purpose of dispatching this Booklet. It will not be shared with any other person or body and will not be stored after the Booklet has been dispatched.

Download this article as a PDF here

Ringer’s Write-up – ART Teaching Basic Handling Course January 26th New Alresford

I’m writing this a day after ringing the treble to Plain Hunt on 5 for the first time at Service ringing.  I’m in no way an expert at ringing and probably never will be. But in my 30 months of ringing I’ve experienced and been tutored by brilliant teaching by a local Ringing Master called Dave* and have witnessed appalling and dangerous teaching along the way too. I’m at a point in my ringing where I feel that I would like to be more involved in passing on my hard-won lessons in learning basic handling but never felt confident about supporting new learners.  In essence, I want to be more Dave.  I know I can’t be more Dave on my own though and this is where the ART Teaching Bell Handling module gives me the structure and order that I need as a person and as a tutor.

The day course took us ten ringers through a mixed programme of well-paced and relevant presentations in the church hall and sessions on the silenced bells in the easily accessed ringing chamber of St. John’s, New Alresford, Hampshire.

The handling sessions followed a demonstration and copy in pairs format . With two ringers per rope , the component parts of bell handling, including raising and lowering , were broken down into separate teaching points and practiced , face to face , eye-ball to eye-ball, adult to adult with feedback and improvement increasing throughout the day.

However many times you hear phrases such as ‘hold the tail end like this..’, or ‘long pull now…’, ‘catch higher up the sally..’ , there is nothing like hearing the sound of your own voice saying it to someone else.  The view from the teacher’s side of the rope is very, very different. Teaching the basics to the capable is, once you get over the initial awkwardness, hugely rewarding.  Sharing control of a bell feels strange to begin with but part of the purpose of the course is to familiarise ourselves with all the oddness of being the ‘other side of the rope’.  A very safe way to experience these emotions and work through them so that, when facing a complete beginner, it is not a complete surprise.

The one-to-one work in the Tower I was expecting. What completely took my breath away was the supporting ART materials.  The course demonstrated and allowed me to experience a logical teaching progression in practice, but behind this are the materials for the tutor and also, importantly, for the learner. With two sides to every beginner’s rope we cannot forget what the learner’s journey is like.  With my course pack I received some really nicely produced books emphasising the detail and structure of teaching and learning in the ART scheme. It is, after all, a scheme. An order of work.  An interpretation of how the basics can be taught in a loosely formal way so that progress can be logged by both tutor and learner, the fundamentals not overlooked and achievement recorded and celebrated.

Dave doesn’t need ART to teach. I know that I do. ART lets me be more Dave.  I’m ok with that. What I lack in instinctive teaching ability I gain in structure and with it, confidence. And projecting confidence is essential in communicating new knowledge and developing a sustained and rewarding tutor/student relationship.

Since participating in the M1 Course Teaching Basic Handling I’ve been more confident as a ringer in my own right, and more willing to step in and speak up with advice and support.  We’re all different. Delivering teaching through the ART scheme may not suit every tutor or every learner. But thanks to ART I have the option of being more Dave.

 *Dave isn’t his real name….

Gary Marsh,

Wonston Tower, Winchester District

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ART Conference 2019 – Goes to Worcester! – 2nd – 3rd March 2019

ART Conference 2019 – Goes to Worcester!

ART will be holding its annual conference on 2/3 March at Worcester. The exciting agenda includes a great line up of speakers, with keynotes by:

Mark Regan, the Ringing Master at Worcester Cathedral, who will not only be looking to the future, but offering visits to the Cathedral Ringing Centre. Book early, as places are limited!
Matt Bulbeck, a professional outdoor sports coach and bell ringing teacher.
New-ish ringers Ian and Louise Wilson, with their take on bell ringing leadership based on 20 years of knowledge and experience gained in industrial and academic settings.
Simon Linford and Clare McArdle, who will be talking about Project Pickled Egg alongside the re-launch of the Learning the Ropes Plus scheme.
Reflecting the rapid proliferation of questions and concerns around recent events, additions to the ART line-up include presentations from the Church of England about safeguarding and the C of E, bell ringing insurance and risk assessments. There will be opportunities to talk through any local issues with the experts who will be available throughout the day.

The second day of the conference weekend concentrates on building a vision for the future of youth ringing and is hosted by the Central Council. A day of speakers and break-out sessions. A day for you to help shape the future. A day for anyone interested in developing the leaders and ringers of the future.

A Vision for the Future of Youth Ringing – David Hull
Putting Girls in the Lead: How Girlguiding Does it – Fiona Joines
Successful Leaders and the D of E Scheme – Christopher O’Mahony
Parental Involvement: What can we Learn from other Activities – Pip Penney
Different ages, different approaches – David Smith
The day will include a number of break-out sessions led by youth leaders. These will provide plenty of opportunities to share ideas and good practice and give you the chance to draw a vision of the future and start working towards it.

The ART Conference is our leading national event and is open to anyone with an interest in ringing teaching and leadership. We would like to invite you to join us at Worcester on 2nd & 3rd March 2019 for what is sure to be a full and interesting weekend.

» Book your conference place now

http://ringingteachers.org/conference

Association of Ringing Teachers/ART Training Scheme: Course places available.

Two great minds (Alan Bentley and Tim Kettle) have been at work together to host this great opportunity within the C&S District: A one day course (Module 1) Teaching Bell Handling.  This will be held at St. Peter’s, Bournemouth on 9th March 2019 with tutor Gill Hughes. In time we plan to host more in the undercroft conference centre.

St. Peter’s has great facilities within its undercrofts, and in time we hope will become known on the ringers-map as a ‘Learning/Ringing Centre’, as the church invests in making the staircase, tower, steeple, bells more accessible to the public and awareness.  We are very lucky to home a beautiful heavy ring of 8 by Taylor’s (21cwt in E), recast as a complete set in the 1930’s. The tower is also home to the popular and successful weekly tailored practice night specifically geared towards bell handling.

For more information please contact Tim Kettle, Ringing Master of St. Peter’s.

The ART AWARDS and how to apply.

The ART Awards continue to grow every year – with over £3,000 in prize money waiting to be won. Now is your chance to apply for the 2019 ART Awards!

The teaching awards (the first six listed below) are open to everyone – not just ART Members or those using ‘Learning the Ropes’ scheme – the aim is to encourage and recognise the people and groups leading best practice and innovation in the teaching and development of ringing. The individual ringing awards are open to those who have completed one of the Learning the Ropes programmes (on tower or hand bells) or participated in the Learning the Ropes Plus scheme.

ART Awards 2019

Prizes will be awarded in the following categories:

The Sarah Beacham Youth Group Award
Prize of £400 – sponsored by the Sarah Beacham Memorial Trust

The Sarah Beacham School Group Award
Prize of £400 – sponsored by the Sarah Beacham Memorial Trust

The ART Award for Excellence in the Use of Technology in Teaching
Prize of £500 – sponsored by John Taylor & Co.

The ART Award for Excellence in Recruitment or Retention
Prize of £400 – sponsored by AbelSim

The ART Award for a University Society that has made a Significant Contribution to Promoting Ringing to Younger People
Prize of £500 – sponsored by CCCBR

The ART Award for Inspiring Leadership in Ringing
Prize of £400 – sponsored by Talent Innovations

The ART Learning the Ropes Individual Achievement Awards
Two prizes of £250 – sponsored by the Ancient Society of College Youths
Five highly commended prizes of £25 each

Worried about applying?

The judges (led by Stephanie Pattenden) aren’t looking for the most professional application; what they are looking for is ideas, commitment and results. So if you’re looking at new ways of recruiting it’s not just the idea, but the number of people you recruited and whether they stayed. Easy ways to show that – number retained a year or two later, new recruits coming in (success breeds success), quarter peals, striking competition results, practice attendance, or ringing progress (LtR Levels) and don’t forget photos and quotes. There’s no magic formula; think why what you’re doing has been successful and put it down on paper. Please don’t be modest!

What are we looking for?

Hopefully having convinced you that the ART Awards might be relevant to you or a ringer or group you know, what are the common themes that appear in previous years’ winning applications?

  • Having a vision or passion and making it happen: however big or small, making things happen is what leadership is all about, even if you don’t call it that.
  • Trying out new things: some of which work and some of which don’t. If we don’t move with the times ringing will not flourish, so tell us about the risks you took – what you tried or did differently
  • Getting young people ringing: over-turning all those misconceptions that exist about children seeing ringing as “uncool” and giving up at the first hurdle.

If you recognise and identify with any of these themes, why not consider applying for yourself or a ringer or group you know? There will be an ART Award that’s right for your application….and if you applied and didn’t win last year, how about applying again, now you’ve got another year under your belt – Lerryn School did that last year and they won!

How do I enter?

Further information and application forms are available at www.ringingteachers.org/recognition/awards.

The closing date for applications is 31 December 2018 – so now is the time to make sure that those doing great work don’t miss out!

sent by Louise Nightingale, Communications & Marketing Workgroup Lead

 

 

ART Module 1 – New Alresford – Sat 26th January 2019 – 9.30am-5.00pm

The Ringing Remembers campaign has resulted in many people coming forward to learn to ring, but with the current profile of the ringing population, we need to continuously recruit and train more new ringers. Many people end up teaching because there is no-one else in their tower prepared to do it, and they have little or no training or support. Founded seven years ago to address this issue, the Association of Ringing Teachers (ART) has grown rapidly. More than 2,600 people have now attended one of the ART Teacher Training Scheme modules.

Working with the Guild Education Committee, there will be an ART Module 1 day course (teaching bell handling) at St John, New Alresford on Saturday 26th January 2019 – 9.30 till 5.00pm.

This module is designed to help teachers deliver the Learning the Ropes scheme to new ringers, and is open to people who have sufficiently good bell control to inspire confidence in others, whether they have taught someone to handle before, or not. To book a place visit: https://smartringer.org/m1dc/26673/

Further details are on the attached flyer for your tower notice board.

ART Flyer New Alresford – 26th January 2019

Tower Talk 8 – Special Ringing Remembers Edition

Welcome to the latest issue of Tower Talk, the magazine for ringers on the Learning the Ropes scheme.

This is a special edition for the run up to the 100th anniversary of the Armistice.

11 November is always a poignant day for ringers, but this year it is particularly special because it is the 100th anniversary of the Armistice and, on top of that, ringers all around the country are being recruited in the ‘Ringing Remembers’ campaign to honour the 1400 ringers known to have been lost in the Great War. We have taken this opportunity to introduce you to some of our newest ringers who have got involved through Ringing Remembers. There is plenty to read in here, but it’s only a flavour of all the hard work which is going on everywhere to get ready to ‘ring for peace’.

Read Tower Talk magazine

If one of your ringing colleagues started (or returned to) ringing since November 2017 then why not get them to sign up to the Armistice 100 band

Ruth Suggett
Editor, Tower Talk
Learning the Ropes from the Association of Ringing Teachers

Visitor’s Quarter Peal First at Ryde

The Island ringers were hosts to a group of ringers from the Witney and Woodstock Branch of the Oxford Diocesan Guild for a 3-day tour.
The group, led by Michael Probert, arrived on Friday and started with a practice at All Saints’, Ryde.
During the course of the fairly reasonable weekend for weather the group managed to ring at all the Island’s towers, and I’m told enjoyed their time over here.
The tour concluded with ringing at Ryde again, this time four of their group joined four of the Ryde band in a quarter peal of Single Oxford Bob Triples. The successful ring was the first in this method for all the visitors, and I must admit they were feeling quite chuffed with the ring as they left the tower to catch the ferry home.
The quarter peal is recorded on Bellboard as follows:
Sunday, 15 April 2018 in 50 min (26 2cwt)
1260 Single Oxford Bob Triples
1 Vivien Nobbs
2 Lindsey Thornton (Stonefield)
3 Alison T Merryweather-Clarke (North Leigh)
4 John R Stock
5 Michael Probert (Freeland)
6 Neil R Ephgrave (Freeland)
7 Graham Nobbs (C)
8 Kieran Downer
For Evensong and to Celebrate the Centenary of The Lions Club and 30th Anniversary of the Lady Lions.
First in method: 2, 3, 5, 6; visiting ringers from Witney & Woodstock Branch of the Oxford Diocesan Guild.

TowerTalk Magazine – Issue 7 is out.

TowerTalk is a magazine produced by the Association of Ringing Teachers

Welcome to the 7th issue of Tower Talk, the magazine for ringers on the Learning the Ropes scheme.

We hope that you enjoy this latest edition of Tower Talk.  If so, why don’t you forward this email or print off a copy of the magazine so that other new ringers can feel part of this amazing community which stretches right around the world.

Read Tower Talk magazine

In this edition …

The theme this time is ‘Ringing Around the World’. Have you ever been on holiday and heard bells ringing and felt the urge to join in? I think most of us feel that way, whether we have been ringing for years or just a few months! Those of us lucky enough to live in the UK can do this easily, but to do it in other countries takes a bit of planning. In this edition we hear from a few ringers who have combined travel and ringing.

  • Level 4 and Counting by Hannah Brighty
  • New Ringer, New Teacher by Ruth Gilbert
  • Ladies Who Lunch by Gillian Hosking
  • Hyperactive Thursdays! by Charlie Linford
  • An Unexpected Journey by Nic Boyd
  • Australian Diary by Karen Adamson
  • 50 Ringing Things: Moving Out of My Comfort Zone, part 2 by Lucy Gwynne
  • Rocky Mountain High by Kathryn McCarthy
  • Rope and Wheel, Bell and Stone – The Magic of Ringing by Laura Goodin
  • Parlez-vous Bonglais? by Les Boyce
  • Ringing Remembers in 2018 by Vicki Chapman

Ruth Suggett
Editor, Tower Talk
Learning the Ropes from the Association of Ringing Teachers
towertalk@learningtheropes.org

TEACHING FROM ROUNDS TO PLAIN HUNT; A ONE DAY COURSE (MODULE 2F) Lytchett Matravers 2nd June

St. Mary the Virgin, Lytchett Matravers, BH16 6BS

2nd June, 2018

Tutor: Gill Hughes

Course fee: £20, plus £6.50 for lunch & refreshments.

On-line bookings (ref: DOR2618M2F):   https://smartringer.org/public/daycourses/

Aim of course:

Provides you with the skills and techniques necessary to build really good foundation ringing skills in your ringers. The course is designed for anyone involved in teaching a new band where the teacher can personally ring at least plain hunt. Theory sessions will cover:

  • the importance of approaching teaching in easy, understandable stages,
  • the critical importance of using effective feedback,
  • the theory of coaching, and
  • how to form a strong band.

This theory is supported by practical sessions that show how to develop these skills, including how to teach call changes, an exploration of kaleidoscope ringing, and different ways to introduce ringers to covering and plain hunt.

Who can become a teacher:

A Teacher is a ringer who may have some or no teaching experience. New teachers will learn how to teach in a structured, effective way and develop their confidence while existing teachers will learn new skills and techniques.

Anyone aged 14 years or older can participate.

Experienced teachers are also invited to apply who would like to mentor a less experienced teacher.

 

What is expected of a new teacher:

It is appropriate for the Teachers who are students on the course to have    sufficiently good bell control to be able to inspire confidence in the new ringers, their mentors, the tower captain (if appropriate) and other members of the learner’s band.

For further information about the course, the ART Training Scheme and becoming an ART accredited teacher contact:

Alan Bentley          click here to email               01202 824197

http://ringingteachers.org/

Plain Bob Doubles – There is a better way!

Phil Ramsbottom is a member of the St. Martin’s Guild, and an ART teacher.

SUMMARY

  • In the light of many years experience, the writer recommends improving the teaching of method ringing in the following way:
    Move away from teaching Plain Bob Doubles which is leading to losing many recruits early in the learning process.
  • Use other ways of teaching proper method ringing, such as Bastow, to provide a more direct and quicker route into ringing the basic lines which ringers use throughout their ringing lives.
  • Use other techniques to teach learners (… our future ringers) and in doing so, ensure they leave the tower after every practice having achieved something and with a real sense of achievement. That way we will keep more recruits.

Plain Bob Doubles: the long tradition

For as many years as I can remember, Plain Bob Doubles has been the vehicle for introducing new ringers to changeringing, be it plain hunting on the treble or ringing ‘inside’.
Equally, for as many years as I can remember, it’s very rarely that I’ve not witnessed a new recruit struggling for many more weeks than should be allowed trying to get to grips with the basic ideas of learning a Blue Line and converting it into actions whilst ringing a bell.

Many’s the time I’ve witnessed a pupil learning to plain hunt on the treble, the backstrokes into 3rds and 5ths place always seeming to be a problem. When it comes to learning to ring the method inside, again I have seen too many (far too many) managing a plain course
after months of trying after which it seems to be another six months or more of endless 120’s keeping them as observation bell.

During this stage we seem to lose far too many new recruits, which considering the hundreds of man hours invested in getting this far is an intolerable waste of teaching time. We’re teaching Bob Doubles (and very badly at that) and not teaching ropesight. I have asked many fellow ringers why this attachment to Bob Doubles, only to be told: “Well a pupil can learn to make seconds, far places, dodge in 3-4 up and down all in the same method”.

This is not a persuasive argument: a learner driver, for example, doesn’t attempt to do three point turns or hill starts in their first lesson. The individual skills required are learnt separately, one at a time, slowly coming together in order to gain competence. We need to introduce a system for teaching the individual basic manoeuvres used in methods and in doing so a system which will help familiarize the pupil with, and help them to develop, ropesight. Bob Doubles is not that method.

Plain Hunting with elementary ropesight

It must be said that, for what follows, the use of a wipe clean board and pens in the tower will assist greatly, but only in order to illustrate the Blue Lines immediately prior to ringing without the need for weeks of revision beforehand which often ‘put off’ the learner.

As I mentioned above, most learners (or least the ones I’ve witnessed) take more than a few weeks to get to grips with the mechanics of plain hunting on 5, normally memorizing the numbers, which lets face it, isn’t difficult. Only when touches are embarked on do they have their first taste of needing ropesight and thus more weeks are added to the process.

So, simplify it. Begin by plain hunting on just 2 bells. For what follows, assume that 6 bells are always being rung and the pupil is on the treble. The pupil simply learns to lead for a whole turn, make seconds over the second and lead again. Just four changes but usually easily achieved after only a couple of attempts. Once competent at this, again probably after only a few minutes, then call a different bell into seconds place telling the pupil to work out which bell prior to saying ‘go’ once more. Progressively, giving less time for the pupil to find the seconds place bell (i.e. call a bell into seconds immediately followed by ‘go’). Already the pupil is grasping basic ropesight and after only say 10 or fifteen minutes at the very most. If possible, try and get this far without interruption, i.e. calling stand to ring something else.

The added bonus of this is that the pupil goes home having achieved changeringing by the end of practice night, albeit very basic, unaided as opposed leaving the tower wondering: “Will I ever be able to ring Bob Doubles” which I’ve heard said many times.

We then move on to plain hunting on 3 bells. Apply the same rules as above, giving plenty of practice first with bells 2 and 3 in the correct place moving on to having different bells in 2nds and 3rds place. Don’t feel the need to leave 4, 5 and 6 as cover bells, get them involved too as it all benefits the learner.

Stating the blindingly obvious, now do the same again on 4 bells. Once able to do this with the bell positions changed round, there’s a several things to try next. Firstly while still ringing on 6, ring a plain course or touch of Plain Bob Minimus, with 5 and 6 covering.

Secondly, do the same but starting from a different change other than rounds and also with say 4 and 6 or 3 and 6 as cover bells. Thirdly, try the same but using a method where the treble returns to lead passing the bells in a different order. And lastly, if a suitable band is to hand, try a plain course of Little Bob Minor. The pupil will most likely quickly remember the numbers to get through a plain course, but having developed at least some ropesight in the
earlier exercises, moving on to ring touches doesn’t usually, and shouldn’t, cause too much difficulty.

In all my experience of teaching, I’ve rarely had to go beyond two weeks of practices to achieve the above, although time allocation of the evening might need to be slightly more in favour of the learner, – but look at the payback!

At this point, despite not having yet attempted hunting on 5, move on to ringing inside, and yes, on 4 bells not 5.

Bastow Little Court Bob Minimus

Allow me now to introduce what I consider to be a rather wonderful little method called Bastow which, whilst not stretching the skills of your average ringer, is the best thing I’ve ever discovered for introducing learners to ringing methods inside and ropesight.

Bastow

By way of comparison I have reproduced the method here, and below, I’ve shown the more usually preferred Plain Bob Doubles. Now ask yourselves this, if you were to show the average learner these two diagrams, which of the two Blue Lines are they most likely to want to learn first? I’ve always had the same reply, – the easiest. Now call me biased, but are there any ringers out there who honestly think that the line for Plain Bob Doubles is the easier of the two? I seriously doubt it, and yet this seems to be the normal approach to teaching method ringing inside.

Plain Bob Doubles

At this stage it’s also worth pointing out that it’s possible to get a total novice band as far as this stage without needing additional assistance. Starting hunting on just 2 bells and working upwards in numbers can be done with just one ringer present who
understands plain hunting.

Likewise, once a band has got this far, it’s possible to get the same band ringing courses of Bastow with only one experienced ringer. Try doing that with Bob Doubles. Ok, it’s probably been done somewhere but it’s MUCH harder work.

Bastow with 2 as hunt bell (treble line)

So far, our ‘learner’ has been ringing the treble bell to all the hunting. So, lets keep life simple for them and keep them ringing the treble, – after all, they’ve got used to it by now. To do this we simply start the method in a different place, the second becomes the hunt bell (starting by leading and then making seconds etc…) and all the treble does is this^^.

The purpose of this is to get our pupil to learn how to move towards a dodging position and then perform dodges in 3-4 up and 3-4 down.

To begin with we can help them, for example by explaining that they won’t be dodging with the second: the first dodge is with the last bell they meet at the back; and the other dodge is with the remaining bell.

Once this is mastered, and again usually quite quickly, then start changing the numbers round, and as was done in the plain hunting, introducing other bells into the changes. Say, for example, starting from 153246 with 4 and 6 covering.

Remember, wherever possible, as with all the previous exercises, the ringing should be on 6 bells. It’s also worth noting that I don’t advocate the usual practice of learning the sequence of work, other than it’s simply 3-4 up followed by 3-4 down, another factor which makes this a more appealing way of learning method ringing.

So where do we go from here? Thinking logically, and to avoid the tedium of learning the sequence of work, extend the Bastow to all 6 bells, and keeping our learner on the treble we now have a line which looks like this.

This I’m sure you’ll agree is starting to look like something we recognize as being of
some use, say almost Treble Bob on 6, or half of Little Bob Minor.

From experience,  the learner won’t gasp at the prospect of going up to 6ths place for the first time. It’s simply the next dodging position to them. Again, by way of guidance, explain that having done the 3-4 up dodge, simply pass the next bell and then dodge again with
the one after that. Then lie for 2 blows dodging with the bell which comes up to meet you at the back. The only difficulty I’ve experienced is showing the learner how to pick out the bell for the 3-4 down dodge, but as with everything so far, this is more
often than not learned quickly.

Again, the numbers may well be learnt without trying but by this stage that’s not such a bad thing as we have a learner whom we can now move around a bit and get used to ringing different bells. For example, ringing the method correctly with the treble as the hunt bell and the learner ringing the second and/or the third. Doing this negates the need to start from anything other than rounds there being things we can now move on to which will help to develop the ropesight we’re trying to achieve.

After that, one of the next logical steps is adding the dodges in 1-2 and then trebling to an appropriate method. The other alternative, having mastered this line, is to then ring the second to Little Bob pointing out the need not to dodge with the treble in 3-4
at the relevant point. That being said, there’s no reason where these two options can’t be run concurrently. Once these are out of the way there are many different paths to take. Personally I head towards learning the Bobs and then on to Plain Bob Minor and splicing it with Little Bob, even if only in plain courses at first.

Conclusion

  • Stop teaching Plain Bob Doubles and wondering why we lose so many recruits at this stage in the learning process.
  • Introduce a means of teaching proper method ringing, and by that, have a different but far more direct and quicker route into ringing the basics of the lines we ring throughout our ringing lives.
  • Teach our learners (and our future ringers) in a way which means they leave the tower after every practice feeling as though they’ve achieved something and not just got better at something, as opposed to the usual: “Come back next week and we’ll have another go at it”. They don’t always come back next week – and it’s too late then!

Phil Ramsbottom

Your comments are welcome on this article – scroll down to post publicly, or click here to email the author

Workshop – “How to talk about ringing!” Sat April 21st

Hi all

We are putting on a special workshop with Mark Regan sharing and teaching on “How to talk about ringing!” in an inspiring and engaging way.  We have a few places still available with a deadline of 28thMarch so I wondered if any of you fancied joining us – I know I could do with help to be sure everything I say to members of the public and/or the press has maximum and positive impact – here are the details if you’re interested –

Sat April 21st, 9.30 to 2pm at Amersham, Bucks.

Donation of £15 towards expenses

Please see further details and opportunity to register via the link:

hpttps://site.corsizio.com/c/59e337b4932ced07ee4b7ce8

Elva Ainsworth

Ainsworth

PR Officer, ODG

ART Works Magazine – latest edition

Welcome to the latest issue of ART WORKS, the magazine for ART Members and teachers on the ART Training Scheme. The magazine is an opportunity for teachers to tell others about their experiences, share their successes and keep them informed of news, tips and opportunities.

Read ART WORKS magazine

In addition to its regular features, this edition includes:

  • Ringing Remembers
  • Slapton Belles
  • Group Teaching at the Castor Ringing School
  • Andrew’s Special Learning Journey
  • Education Matters
  • Caistor Ringers Discover Learning the Ropes
  • Getting Everyone on Board
  • Training in the Vale
  • Harder than quantum physics

Towertalk magazine for people Learning the Ropes

Welcome to the 6th issue of Tower Talk, the magazine for ringers on the Learning the Ropes scheme.

We hope that you enjoy this latest edition of Tower Talk.  If so, why don’t you forward this email or print off a copy of the magazine so that other new ringers can feel part of this amazing community which stretches right around the world.

Read Tower Talk magazine

 

In this edition …

Happy New Year! to all ringers using Learning the Ropes – here’s to a successful year, and we hope you all achieve everything you have in your sights!

Once again we have collected a mix of stories to motivate and inspire you to aim high, to keep going, to try something new, to help someone, to tackle that thing which has been eluding you, to share your success …

With New Year comes talk of resolutions and in ringing it’s the same – and so this time we are focusing on the ’50 Ringing Things’ which provides a huge number of ringing related challenges which you can aim for and have a bit of fun as well. Have you seen the booklet? If not, you can find details of it here on the Learning the Ropes website, and you can order your copy from the ART Shop.

With 50 Ringing Things, you can explore the wide world of ringing and the many different activities that hook fellow bell ringers into this addictive hobby. A variety of contributors have written a series of entertaining and informative tips and guidelines to help you get the most out of each challenge. When you’ve ticked off a challenge yourself, why not share your experience on the 50 Things Facebook group? And 15, 30 and 50 challenges completed entitle you to order a Bronze, Silver or Gold certificate!
So let’s meet some of our fellow ringers who have thrown themselves into the challenge!

Ruth Suggett
Editor, Tower Talk
Learning the Ropes from the Association of Ringing Teachers

ART WORKS – the latest news and ideas from ART

Hello all,

Here is a magazine for your perusal over a cuppa.

It gives a nice insight/update to what is happening.

Regards

Deb Baker 😊


The quarterly magazine for ringing teachers

Welcome to the latest issue of ART WORKS, the magazine for ART Members and teachers on the ART Training Scheme. The magazine is an opportunity for teachers to tell others about their experiences, share their successes and keep them informed of news, tips and opportunities.

In addition to its regular features, this edition includes:

  • ART news updates – Conference, Awards
  • Pip’s Teaching Tips – teaching Plain Bob Doubles
  • 50 Ringing Things – a teacher’s story
  • What happened at the ringing courses held at Tulloch Ringing Centre
  • An insider’s account of the Learning the Ropes Masterclass
  • A teaching refresher event in the Ely DA
  • ART working in Devon – striking competition success

ART seeks new Resource Administrator

If you’re interested in helping ART on a part-time basis then we are looking to employ someone to keep up to date and improve our resources and web pages.  More details are available on the ART website.

Applications deadline is 31 December 2017.

Apply for an ART Award

The deadline for applying for an ART Award is fast approaching.  If you or a teacher you know is doing great things then why not apply for an ART Award.  And don’t forget to nominate your Level 5 Learning the Ropes Achievers for an award – the prize structure has changed this year so more ringers are recognised and receive a prize.  Have a look on the ART website for more information about the different awards and to download an application form.

Claire Culham
Editor, ART WORKS
Association of Ringing Teachers
artworks@ringingteachers.org

ART Supporters

ART is very grateful to the donations of our growing number of ART Supporters in facilitating our work to deliver ringing teaching and learning fit for the 21st Century.

PATRONS
Whiting Society
Paul Flavell
Helen McGregor and Peter Bevis

SPONSORS
John Cater
Tony Daw
Graham Nabb
Simon Linford
The Parker Family
Pip Penney
Phil Ramsbottom
Jacqueline Hazell
The Sarah Beacham Trust
AbelSim
Abingdon Society of Change Ringers
The Oxford Diocesan Guild
The Scottish Association of Change Ringers
North Bucks Branch (ODG)

Are you interested in becoming an ART Supporter? Please contact Graham Nabb.

Are you a bellringing Innovator? You could win a share of £3000

Image shows one of thr W&P winners from 2017

 

I know many of you will have seen the following message from Graham, think of it as a reminder if necessary to further encourage people you know who could qualify to apply, and to share the link with others in your catchment.  Closing date for this year’s applications is 31 December.

Alan Bentley
On behalf of ART Mgmt. Comm.
Applications open for the 2018 ART Awards
The ART Awards continue to grow every year – with close to £3,000 awarded in prizes last year. Now is your chance to apply for the ART Awards 2018!
The teaching awards are open to everyone – not just ART Members or those using ‘Learning the Ropes’ scheme – and the aim is to encourage and recognise the people and groups leading best practice and innovation in the teaching and development of ringing.
Whilst it can sound intimidating to apply for a national award, when all you’re doing is having fun and making things happen, the ART Awards are there for normal ringers like you doing what you consider to be the right things – it’s only the rest of us that are in awe of what you are doing.
 

October Edition of Towertalk available to download

» Download Tower Talk – October 2017

  • A Golden Opportunity
  • The Story of The School
  • Exceeding All Expectations
  • Bell Ringing School Hits the Right Note for Christine
  • It Started with a Tweet!
  • A New Approach to an Old Problem
  • Quirky Foibles
  • We’ve No bells!
  • Australian Diary
  • A Grand Day Out: Marsworth Bell Ringers
  • Eight Of Us!
  • Learning Tips No.5: Odd One IN!

Building a bright and secure future for ringing

This open letter was sent by Graham Nabb to all ART teachers and other interested ringers:

As ringers and teachers you are already making a big difference, but have you considered doing something more?

Now could be just the right time. The ringer’s representative body, the Central Council, has voted for radical change and is now looking for volunteers who can make that change happen. It is setting up a small number of workgroups that require skilled, charismatic and hands-on leaders and helpers who want to make a difference. This isn’t a realignment of committees but is a much bolder project, aimed at doing what is required to build and secure a bright future for ringing. Something we in ART are all committed to.

These workgroups are:

  • Volunteer and Leadership Development (the people)
  • Tower Stewardship and Management (the hardware)
  • Communications and Marketing (sharing)
  • Historical and Archive (our past)
  • Direct membership channel (our relationships)

Anyone can volunteer to join or lead these workgroups. You don’t have to be a Central Council rep or a ringing society officer. What you do need, is a love of ringing, a desire to create a ringing environment fit for the 21st century and the skills to help deliver that. It would be great if a lot of ordinary ringers and teachers like you joined and made this happen.

If you’re interested in volunteering then visit the “reform” page on the CCCBR website and complete the online form at www.cccbr.org.uk/about/reform/nomination-form. This form will be open until Friday 6th October.

Do please think carefully about what you can do for ringing, and volunteer for one (or more) of these roles. This is a fantastic opportunity to make a difference; to give something back to ringing; and to build and secure a bright future for ringing.
For more information click through to the Central Council website.

Graham Nabb
Chairman to the Association of Ringing Teachers
grahamnabb@ringingteachers.org
www.ringingteachers.org