Category Archives: Christchurch And Southampton District

More web pages to (almost) complete the C&S set

Draft pages (awaiting feedback from their bands) for Breamore, Eling, Fawley, Fordingbridge, Harbridge, Hinton, Hordle, Sopley, the Hartley 12 and South Stoneham have been added to the new Guild website.

Southampton City Ringers have their own website, so a page has been added for the City, and once their webmaster has given input, the “zone” will be completed.

Eling Tower (and Friends) outing 24th October 2015 – Video by Steve Hough

Steve Hough writes:

On Saturday 24th October Eling ringers had their first Outing in quite a few years. Organised by yours truly, for the benefit of our newer ringers to give them experience ringing at different towers. A good day out apart from the weather!

The band filmed at Broughton, East Tytherley, Mottisfort, Nether Wallop,Stockbridge and West Tytherley

8 bell practice St. John’s Bournemouth Tuesday 10th November – Plain Bob Major

The success of the October’s Little Bob Major practice has inspired the St. John’s band to pursue the method, aiming towards spliced Plain and Little Bob Major. For that reason, forthcoming special practices are planned to be:

  • 10th November – Touches of Plain Bob Major
  • 8th December – Plain and Little Bob Major Spliced

Practice Report – CS District Youth Practice

The good thing about having our Youth practices each holiday, is there’s a bit less pressure on our time. The downside is  a couple of the regular attenders were on holiday. However, the 8 young ringers present included 3 new faces and 4 towers were represented.

Once again, Ringing Master Sallie Ingram (Milford) juggled different skill levels from rounds, call changes to Grandsire Doubles, and the highlight was probably the “Fast Call Changes” with only one over-18 ringing….. fast really did mean fast, sometimes with 2 changes called for the same row!

For young learners who ring heavy bells at home, we started with a session on Ringing Up – for some this was their first successful attempt and they were delighted at how manageable they found the bells! Once on to Rounds, the newcomers quickly got the feel for the fast ringing, and the need to pull gently, and all had plant of turns and enjoyed the practice.

Thanks once more to our hosts at Brockenhurst – next year’s 6 practices are scheduled to take place there as it is ideal.

Photo by Jack, Christchurch

The feet were from Brockenhurst, Christchurch, Milford and Ringwood

Planned change to C&S Calendars *** affects people who have downloaded them into their own calendar**

The move will make the C&S calendar properly compatible with the Guid’s calendar….

C&S Bellringers ARCHIVE SITE

The District calendars are going to improve….

Why are things changing?

  • Since the website was created 3 years ago, the way google calendars are managed within WordPress (which manages our site) has improved dramatically. They should now display 100% properly on all screen sizes.
  • The new Guild website (which is currently in the pipeline) will use Google Calendars to manage all the event calendars. To make that possible, the current single “all district events” calendars, will split into 4 parts – the monthly practices, the special (mostly Saturday) events, the Guild Education events, and other Guild events.

What If I have already downloaded the calendars?

You will need to download the new ones in order to see all the events. It takes a couple of minutes, and you will be able to see all the information again. While people are moving over, you may see some events duplicated. That will…

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CS District Youth Practice Saturday October 24th Brockenhurst 5.30pm

district-youth-practice-24th-october-2015-iconA number of our towers are busy teaching under-18s at the moment and the District Youth practices are a really good opportunity for you to meet up and ring – whatever your skill levels. Whether you are ringing Backstoke only, call changes, plain bob or tenoning on 8, this practice is for you!

The bells at Brockenhurst are ideal for the practice as they are light, it’s a ground floor ring, there’s ample parking and it’s 5 minutes walk from a mainline railway station.

Young ringers from neighbouring Districts come along sometimes and are very welcome.

Sopley Minor Methods Practice Wednesday 28th October 7.30pm

The date of the Sopley Minor Practice has moved to the 4th Wednesday in the month from next week 28th October. As a result it no longer clashes with the District Surprise Major practice at Ringwood (first Wednesday) and we hope that this will accommodate anyone who would like to attend both.

To recap, the practice is for anyone who wants to practice Minor methods from Plain Bob through Little Bob, Kent, Oxford  to Cambridge and other methods as requested within the ability of the group. So far a number of ringers have gained experience in basic minor and treble Bob minor and we can pack a lot of touches in to an hour and a half due to the nature of the bells. This practice is for any District ringers who want more help with any of the above so don’t wait for a personal invitation!

This month, in addition to any of the usual methods we are hoping to have a go at spliced plain and little Bob Minor. If you want any more information contact the organisers, Tim Kettle, Chris Smithies or Tim Martin.

Video and writeup from the First Guild Surprise Royal Practice – October 2015

The first new Guild surprise royal practice took place this afternoon at St Michael’s Southampton. Attended by 16 members from across the guild this was a really promising start with all those who attended having enjoyed the practice, and many having found this opportunity very useful.

The focus methods for this first practice were Cambridge and London No3, both of which were rung successfully multiple times. We managed 3 separate lots of London, including a very successful whole course! It’s not very often, if at all, people get the chance to ring a whole courses of methods such as London Royal. The practice also featured a good amount of Cambridge and Yorkshire Royal, all of which proved useful to those attending. 

Hopefully this positive start can generate enthusiasm to keep this practice going, and hopefully over the next few months it will continue to gain momentum and fill that gap in the Guild ringing schedules.

Thanks to all those who attended this afternoon, and watch this space for details of the November practice!

Regards, Daniel Graham (Southampton

Change to Practice Nights Schedule at Lymington

Please be aware that the number of practice nights at Lymington is being reduced during the winter months.
The District Practice will continue on the 2nd Wednesday of the month.
The general tower practice will only take place on the 3rd Thursday of the month (7.30pm – 9pm) and people intending to come should check with Larry Stace, tower captain, in advance to check that the practice is going ahead.

Sunday ringing is unaffected

Ringwood Triples Practice Wednesday 21st October

C&S Bellringers ARCHIVE SITE

The third Wednesday of the month at Ringwood means we will be trying to get all eight of those lovely bells going. As you might have heard, they have recently been overhauled and now they ring even better! Come along next Wednesday and have a go. Everyone’s welcome.

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District Practice Saturday November 7th Sacred Heart 2.30pm

Christchurch and Southampton District – other members are warmly welcome.

C&S Bellringers ARCHIVE SITE

District practice november 2015 icondouble oxford bob minor iconAround 18 members of the District generally come to the monthly District practice, providing an ideal opportunity to learn (or brush up on) skills or just to have a really good ring. It you have not been before, then it is suitable for all levels once you can handle a bell, and you will be welcome to request the method that you are particularly wanting to ring, or rounds, calls changes and plain hunt.

If you want to look up this month’s special method, Double Oxford Bob Minor, then click here for the blue line.  

The bells at Sacred Heart are light and particularly easy for smaller/younger ringers to handle. Parking is near by in a public car park (St. Stevens Road) or the multi story at the top of Richmond Hill. The nearest bus stop is the Bournemouth triangle and ringers arriving by train can catch one of the…

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Practice Night Report – St. John’s Bournemouth Tuesday 13th October – Monthly 8 bell practice

C&S Bellringers ARCHIVE SITE

The ringing chamber at St. John's BournemouthThe plan on Tuesday at St. John’s was to ring plain courses and touches of Little Bob Major. It was a very productive evening with people working on their trebling (to 4ths place and back, so different from the “average” plain method” and ringing inside (lots of treble bobbing, so not only does it sound nice, but it’s a very useful stepping stone towards Surprise Major).

A simple touch that Angie had brought with her, proved to be the most successful as it left the back bells unscrambled and was not too challenging for the rest of the band! The success of the evening has inspired the local band to pursue the method, aiming towards spliced Plain and Little Bob Major. For that reason, forthcoming special practices are planned to be:

  • 10th November – Touches of Plain Bob Major
  • 8th December – Plain and Little Bob Major Spliced

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District Quarter Peal Scored

C&S Bellringers ARCHIVE SITE

District QP oct 13 2015 iconThe first of the District Quarter Peals took place at Brockenhurst last night. The original vision, of providing members of the District with additional opportunities to ring good quarters, was realised, as the band rang a fluent, well struck quarter peal. The fact that almost all volunteered to ring in the next one is proof they enjoyed it!

If you want to join the list of ringers and be included in future events please contact Rosalind.

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C&S District 12 bell practice – 10th October 2015 at Christchurch Priory

C&S Bellringers ARCHIVE SITE

Christchurch Priory 12 bell practice 2015 iconThe District 12 bell practice at Christchurch Priory on Saturday 10th of October will feature Grandsire Caters and Cinques as the special method. As always ringing will include Rounds and Call Changes (this time on up to 12 bells) with plenty of support from people to stand behind you when you need it, plus other methods by request.

Do listen to this video to inspire you – Grandsire Cinques is a glorious, tuneful method and absolutely worth the effort to learn.

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Congratulations Graham Hounslow and Mike Martin – First Peals 5th June 2015

Rosalind Martin, Tim Martin, Colin Butler, Mike Martin, Simon Edwards (C), Graham Hounsleow
Rosalind Martin, Tim Martin, Colin Butler, Mike Martin, Simon Edwards (C), Graham Hounsleow

Graham (Fawley) and Mike (until recently also a Fawley ringer) both scored their first peal at the first attempt on Friday 5th June at Fawley. The target across the whole ringing community is for 300 First Pealers to be successful during 2015, to mark the 300th anniversary of the first recorded peal. Peals in C&S District have contributed 9 people towards this total so far, and anyone else wanting to ring a first peal is invited to contact Colin Butler,  District Ringing Master.

A video of some of the ringing has been posted on the District Facebook Group.

Many thanks once again to Simon Edwards who came down from Swindon to conduct the peal.

Screen Shot 2015-06-06 at 09.00.26Congratulations are also in order for Daniel Scott (Sacred Heart) who scored his first quarter peal of Surprise Major the previous day, also conducted by Simon Edwards.

Learn to Ring at Brockenhurst

The Brockenhurst band are planning to recruit and train a new batch of ringers over the next few months, watch this space for further news! The light eight is ideal for training younger recruits and Julie and Jimmy have plenty of teaching experience between them…..

Continue reading Learn to Ring at Brockenhurst

A Weekend of Firsts in The Christchurch and Southampton District (Feb 2015)

The last weekend of February saw a busy weekend of ringing at the Western end of the Christchurch and Southampton District including several important firsts.

quarter peal at Hinton Admiral
Simon, Tim, Rosalind, Dan, Graham

The weekend began with a pleasant quarter peal of Grandsire Doubles on the recently rehung five at Hinton Admiral on Friday evening. This was a first of Grandsire Doubles for Daniel Scott and only his third quarter peal. It also gave Tim Martin the chance to ring his second quarter at Hinton after his first ever quarter there 36 years ago.

firstpeal2015-band-at-the-priory Feb 2015
Simon, Tim, Rosalind, Dan, Graham

Saturday morning saw four of the same band heading to Christchurch Priory for a peal attempt. A well struck peal of Minor in three methods was achieved in 2h 53m. The band contained two first Pealers, Rosalind Martin and Daniel Scott at their first attempt and was also the first inside for Jack Pease and to mark his 16th Birthday. Apart from the conductor, Simon Edwards from Swindon, all the band were either members of the Priory band or regulars at the Priory practice night so a good local effort.

minstead-churchyard-in-winter-sun
Simon, Tim, Rosalind, Dan, Graham

After a lengthy lunch break three of the band headed out into the New Forest to the recently augmented 6 at Minstead where a well struck quarter of Grandsire Minor contained three firsts of that method inside plus a first of minor.

Used by permission from the church

After service ringing on Sunday Morning at Christchurch Priory and Sacred Heart Bournemouth a quarter peal of Stedman Triples was rung on the fine Taylor octave at St Peter’s Bournemouth being the first of Stedman for Rosalind Martin.

priory sunset
Christchurch Priory

Finally, another quarter peal of Grandsire Doubles was scored back at the Priory for evensong to enable another of the local band, Aila Peacock to ring her first Grandsire inside.

Thanks must go to Simon Edwards for helping us by conducting most of the ringing and for converting that “must do it sometime” plan into a definite reality. The list of achievements is as follows:

First peal

  • Rosalind Martin – Christchurch Priory
  • Daniel Scott – Sacred Heart Bournemouth

First Peal inside.

  • Jack Pease – Hampreston

First Grandsire Doubles

  • Aila Peacock – Christchurch Priory
  • Daniel Scott- Sacred Heart Bournemouth

First Minor

  • Graham Hounslow – Fawley

First Grandsire Minor

  • Rosalind Martin
  • Oliver Chaloner – Southampton City
  • Polly Osborne – Minstead

First Stedman

  • Rosalind Martin

It was also the first time that the Middle six at the Priory have been rung to a peal.

Tim Martin

Bellringing In Bournemouth (Welcome, Calendar, Parking, Access)

Welcome, from the bellringers at St. John’s, St. Peter’s and Sacred Heart, to the world of Bellringing in Bournemouth.

st johns bournemouth photo by Rosalind Martin
st johns

St John’s tuneful octave hosts practices weekly and holds a well attended 8 bell practice on the 2nd Tuesday which draws ringers from across the area.

St Peter’s has a fine heavier ring of 8 in the centre of Bournemouth. The church is an outstanding example of high Victorian church decoration which extends into the ringing chamber.

A rare ring of bells in a catholic church completes the Bournemouth towers with the light six at Sacred Heart within walking distance of St Peter’s.

Each tower has its own band and practice night but the ringers support each other’s towers for extra ringing, weddings and services so if you are in Bournemouth you will be guaranteed a ring somewhere.

Access

  • St John’s has 2 steps up to the ringers’ entrance (the door facing the street) and a bell to ring if locked during practice night. There is a short staircase up to the ringing chamber.
  • Sacred Heart has a short flight steps up at the main entrance (on Albert Rd) then a short spiral staircase up to the ringing chamber. There is a spacious gallery off the ringing chamber so room to spill out if you are waiting to ring.
  • St Peter’s has a sweeping flight of steps up to the ringer’s (and main) entrance facing the road, and a bell to ring if you are late during ringing. The spiral staircase is the first door on your left inside; medium height.

Toilets

  • St John’s has ground floor toilets which are accessible during ringing.
  • St Peter’s toilets are in the basement rooms

Parking

    • St Peters Bournemouth by Jack PeaseSt. John’s has parking for a dozen cars behind the church, and on-street parking outside.
    • St. Peter’s is next to a large public carpark in Upper Hinton Rd, and a footpath leads from the corner of the carpark directly into the top of the churchyard. See Dove Entry for map and coordinates. There is disabled parking in the Churchyard PLEASE contact the tower captain to arrange in advance.
    • Sacred Heart has limited onstreet parking outside if you are lucky, otherwise see Dove entry for the recommended multi-story carpark, the Satnav destination will take you there. There is limited disabled parking PLEASE contact the tower captain to arrange in advance.

Contact us: Click for our contact forms

Visit the church websites 

Calendar of Open Bellringing in Bournemouth

Learn to ring in Minstead (New Forest)

 

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Bishop Jonathan dedicates the new bell at Minstead
Bishop Jonathan dedicates the new bell at Minstead

The bellringers at Minstead are going from strength to strength – so much so that they had an extra bell installed last year! If you might want to join the team read on…

Back in 2008 the band joined together for a big recruitment drive and 8 new ringers were taught on Wednesday Mornings by Andy Pollock. Out of these 8, 5 are still ringing. Their ongoing development is taken very seriously with extra weekday morning practices (by invitation) to build confidence in what is now a group of Method ringers, and prepare them for quarter peals.

Polly Osborne MinsteadEarlier this year, Polly (the Ringing Master) attended the ITTS Module 1 (teaching bell handling) course.  Learning to ring is a process that needs time and patience from both the teacher and the learner.

Most members of the band are regular Sunday Ringers, providing the local community with a reminder that they are welcome to join the Vicar and congregation for morning service.

In addition the band practices regularly each Thursday. Most practice nights are held in Minstead but once a month they are held jointly at Lyndhurst to give the band the change to progess with their 8 bell ringing skills. And because ringers enjoy ringing with their nighbours….

Once you have found your feet as a ringer you will find a warm welcome at other towers and you can spend as much time ringing as you like…… all over the UK and even in Australia, New Zealand, America and South Africa! It is a highly social hobby!

Contact Polly if you want to visit the band and see if bellringing might be for you.

 

A report on the questionnaire completed by 88 members of Christchurch and Southampton District Bellringers in Jan/Feb 2014

About this information….

The (22 page) printable version is: A report on the questionnaire completed by 88 members of Christchurch and Southampton District Bellringers in 2014 If you want to read it properly this will probably be what you want. If you want the summary then click here

88 people filled in the questionnaire before the final deadline, and it is now a rich database that the District committee can use ongoing as they plan events.

It was a real privilege to process the responses – there were a lot of surprises along the way. Many thanks to all those who worked so hard providing, and collecting, responses.

The Finance/Questionnaire Working Party has already discussed it and produced their recommendations. Next step is discussion at the Quarterly Meeting June 7th. 

Introduction to the report

The Questionnaire was designed in 2 parts. Part 1 asked for contact information and was intended to allow better communications within the District, by identifying who is fulfilling which roles in which towers. Part 2 asked for no personal identifying information and was intended to be filled in by all members of the District, to enable the committee to take into account the members’ thoughts, needs and desires, as they plan future events.

This report analyses the results of Part 2 only.

It was shared first within the C&S Finance and Questionnaire Working Party, then with the District Committee prior to this release within the District.

Methodology

The membership of C&S totals around 220 people. Enough paper questionnaires were distributed to each tower (by hand at the ADM), to allow one per member. The replies represent the full spectrum of ringers from beginner to expert, young to old, town and village, enthusiastic to lukewarm. The size of the sample (88 members) is substantial and allows the committee to have confidence in the results. The profile of the people who filled it in vs. those who did not, is believed to be largely down to which tower secretaries and captains set aside time, energy and commitment to the project, and which ringers turned up in their towers during January and February. The questionnaire was also made available online so that members who were not actively ringing, but receiving emails from the District, were also welcome to take part. Some members (less than 10) did choose this method of providing their data. The vast majority of responses were provided on paper.

Most were returned in batches from towers, but a number of individuals made the effort to post them back. This, together with the care people took to provide in depth answers, indicates that members overall were happy to take part in the process and were keen to have their voices heard.

Several comments were made (verbally) to the effect that having paper copies filled in during a practice night was simple and effective, and allowed for a quick and simple collection process. It was noted that the young ringers in Southampton shared this view, despite being very computer-literate. Paper is simple.

The downsides of using paper are the effort of keying in the data, and the effort of interpretation needed, when for example 1-10 scales are filled in with 1-5 or 1,1,1 responses. Has the responses been any more numerous this would have been a significant issue.

8 people did questions 1-11 and then failed to turn over so the sample for q12-22 is 82.

The data analysis was done using Microsoft Excel.

Conclusions:

  • Respondents generally are enjoying ringing. (q17)
  • Respondents have on average 22 years’ experience of ringing. This is reflected in the high levels of skill of a proportion of our members, and is a tremendous asset.
  • We have very few ringers aged 25-50 and the biggest group is 60-70.
  • Respondents ring on average, 10 times a month. This represents a really keen membership, giving a great deal of commitment.
  • The top choice for the role of the District is “raising the standards of ringing”. (q12). Whilst this is implicit in what we do, it is not specifically addressed.
  • The favourite forms of learning currently used by members, are the ones which don’t require travel.  The District caters for them somewhat by encouraging a culture of special monthly practices, and there were a number of favourable comments about these.
  • If the majority of novices want to learn at home, then the District should explore how their experience  could be improved. Eg by giving more training in Conducting, and training in how to run good practices to assistant captains. Anecdotally it was stated that once someone is a Tower Captain, a suggestion of training is perceived as an insult. Beforehand, however, they would be keen.
  • The missing age groups (25-50) are generally very busy people, less likely than other age groups to be able to ring multiple times a week, so they will need excellent teaching in order to progress.
  • Many people begin, or restart, ringing in retirement. (q9). They need excellent teaching and plenty of rope time in order to progress (anecdotal)
  • 37 of the 88 respondents rated themselves as being able to ring “One or two methods” or less. This is a very significant proportion (42%) who are not specifically planned for by the District.
  • People who can ring “one or two methods” are doing much less ringing, and are much less likely to ring away from home. (q4 and q11). And yet, they are the ones who really need to get plenty of rope time in order to progress
  • Far from being an “elite”, Surprise ringers are doing the most ringing, and are very much more likely to ring regularly at another practice night. This means it appears to be in the District’s and Towers’ best interests to create more surprise ringers.
  • There is strong demand for training in Conducting and Putting Right. This is perceived as being difficult to learn (anecdotally).
  • 19 respondents have taught learners.
  • A breakdown of skills against starting date shows that for respondents who started ringing after 1980, significantly fewer are Surprise Ringers (see last table in report, q1 vs q9). There may be many causes for this, but if we wish to nurture Surprise Ringers as a District, then we may need to make more of an effort to nurture them.

The Questionnaire District Questionnaire pdf version

q1 your ringing ability

Q2 – number of bells I can ring

q2 number of bells I can ring

q3 – List of Methods

q3 List of methods

 

q3 – Individual Answers

q3 individual answers methods rung

q4 – How often do you ring?

q4 How Often Do You Ring

 

q5 – Breaking down how often people regularly ring at another practice night, vs skill

q4 How often do you ring by skill level

q5 how many boxes ticked

q6 – How many peals did you ring in 2013?

q6 how many peals did you ring in 2013

q6 – How many quarter peals did you ring in 2013?

q7 how many quarter peals did you ring in 2013

q8 – What age group are you?

 

q8 what age group are you

q9 – When did you start ringing?

q9 when did you start ringing

q10 – Have you had a break from ringing?

q10 have you had a break from ringing

q10 – I stopped because

q10 I stopped because

q10 – Why did you start ringing again?

q10 Why did you start ringing again

q4 – How often do you ring broken down by skill level

q4 How often do you ring by skill level

q11 What are you looking for when you ring elsewhere?

q11 what are you looking for when you ring elsewhere

q11 how many people listed reasons for ringing elsewhere

q11 how many people listed reasons for ringing elsewhere

q12 What do you think is the role of the District

q12 What do you think is the role of the District

q12 how many people expressed an opinion on the role of the District

q12 Graph of What do you think is the role of the District

q12 role of district graph

q13 Do you think the District has another role?

q13 Do you think the District has another role

q14 Preferred Events

q14 preferred events

q15 Idea for an event

q15 Idea for an event

q16 Daytime Availability

q16 daytime availability

q17 Current Experience of Ringing

q17 Current Experience of bellringing

q18 the good things about ringing

q18 the good things about ringing

q19 the bad things about ringing

q19 the bad things about ringing

q20 Opportunities to learn

q20 Opportunities to learn

q21 Preferred ways of learning

q21 Preferred ways of learning

Interpreting q21

Comments:
only 25 people out of 88 (28%) gave correct rankings 1-8 so the sample is small but not unreasonably small.
The top 3 types of learning can all take place WITHOUT FURTHER TRAVEL.
Conclusion is that the most effective way for the District to influence learning is to influence what happenson ordinary practice nights.
*** Training for tower captains?
*** Printed material about different skills eg method diagrams on the board or to take home?
***  More books IN TOWERS
Only a small number of people are (currently) interested in using starting to use software to learn.The software does
require training to be effective, even if only 10 minutes help.

q21 how are people learning at the moment

q21 How are people learning at the moment

  • 34 people gave at least one “A” in question 21, meaning that they were already learning using one of the approaches listed.
  • Not known why 54 people put no “A” codes. Possibly the question was offputtingly complicated.

q22 Support for other ringers

q22 How do you support other ringers

q22 Support for others vs skill level

q22 Your support for others vs skill level

q22 Is there untapped potential?

q22 supporting others. Is there untapped potential

 

q22 Breakdown of who is asking for training

q22 How many people are asking for training

q22 breakdown of those wanting training in conducting and putting right

q22 breakdown of the 13 people asking for training in conducting and putting right

q1 skill level vs q9 when did you start ringing?

q1 skill level vs q9 when did you start ringing

Quick Read – the conclusions from the Questionnaire

Conclusions:

  • Respondents generally are enjoying ringing. (q17)
  • Respondents have on average 22 years’ experience of ringing. This is reflected in the high levels of skill of a proportion of our members, and is a tremendous asset.
  • We have very few ringers aged 25-50 and the biggest group is 60-70.
  • Respondents ring on average, 10 times a month. This represents a really keen membership, giving a great deal of commitment.
  • The top choice for the role of the District is “raising the standards of ringing”. (q12). Whilst this is implicit in what we do, it is not specifically addressed.
  • The favourite forms of learning currently used by members, are the ones which don’t require travel.  The District caters for them somewhat by encouraging a culture of special monthly practices, and there were a number of favourable comments about these.
  • If the majority of novices want to learn at home, then the District should explore how their experience  could be improved. Eg by giving more training in Conducting, and training in how to run good practices to assistant captains. Anecdotally it was stated that once someone is a Tower Captain, a suggestion of training is perceived as an insult. Beforehand, however, they would be keen.
  • The missing age groups (25-50) are generally very busy people, less likely than other age groups to be able to ring multiple times a week, so they will need excellent teaching in order to progress.
  • Many people begin, or restart, ringing in retirement. (q9). They need excellent teaching and plenty of rope time in order to progress (anecdotal)
  • 37 of the 88 respondents rated themselves as being able to ring “One or two methods” or less. This is a very significant proportion (42%) who are not specifically planned for by the District.
  • People who can ring “one or two methods” are doing much less ringing, and are much less likely to ring away from home. (q4 and q11). And yet, they are the ones who really need to get plenty of rope time in order to progress
  • Far from being an “elite”, Surprise ringers are doing the most ringing, and are very much more likely to ring regularly at another practice night. This means it appears to be in the District’s and Towers’ best interests to create more surprise ringers.
  • There is strong demand for training in Conducting and Putting Right. This is perceived as being difficult to learn (anecdotally).
  • 19 respondents have taught learners.
  • A breakdown of skills against starting date shows that for respondents who started ringing after 1980, significantly fewer are Surprise Ringers (see last table in report, q1 vs q9). There may be many causes for this, but if we wish to nurture Surprise Ringers as a District, then we may need to make more of an effort to nurture them.

The full report is here

The C&S questionnaire 2014

Quick Read – the conclusions from the Questionnaire

Conclusions:

  • Respondents generally are enjoying ringing. (q17)
  • Respondents have on average 22 years’ experience of ringing. This is reflected in the high levels of skill of a proportion of our members, and is a tremendous asset.
  • We have very few ringers aged 25-50 and the biggest group is 60-70.
  • Respondents ring on average, 10 times a month. This represents a really keen membership, giving a great deal of commitment.
  • The top choice for the role of the District is “raising the standards of ringing”. (q12). Whilst this is implicit in what we do, it is not specifically addressed.
  • The favourite forms of learning currently used by members, are the ones which don’t require travel.  The District caters for them somewhat by encouraging a culture of special monthly practices, and there were a number of favourable comments about these.
  • If the majority of novices want to learn at home, then the District should explore how their experience  could be improved. Eg by giving more training in Conducting, and training in how to run good practices to assistant captains. Anecdotally it was stated that once someone is a Tower Captain, a suggestion of training is perceived as an insult. Beforehand, however, they would be keen.
  • The missing age groups (25-50) are generally very busy people, less likely than other age groups to be able to ring multiple times a week, so they will need excellent teaching in order to progress.
  • Many people begin, or restart, ringing in retirement. (q9). They need excellent teaching and plenty of rope time in order to progress (anecdotal)
  • 37 of the 88 respondents rated themselves as being able to ring “One or two methods” or less. This is a very significant proportion (42%) who are not specifically planned for by the District.
  • People who can ring “one or two methods” are doing much less ringing, and are much less likely to ring away from home. (q4 and q11). And yet, they are the ones who really need to get plenty of rope time in order to progress
  • Far from being an “elite”, Surprise ringers are doing the most ringing, and are very much more likely to ring regularly at another practice night. This means it appears to be in the District’s and Towers’ best interests to create more surprise ringers.
  • There is strong demand for training in Conducting and Putting Right. This is perceived as being difficult to learn (anecdotally).
  • 19 respondents have taught learners.
  • A breakdown of skills against starting date shows that for respondents who started ringing after 1980, significantly fewer are Surprise Ringers (see last table in report, q1 vs q9). There may be many causes for this, but if we wish to nurture Surprise Ringers as a District, then we may need to make more of an effort to nurture them.

The full report is here

The C&S questionnaire 2014

Quick Read – the conclusions from the Questionnaire

Conclusions:

  • Respondents generally are enjoying ringing. (q17)
  • Respondents have on average 22 years’ experience of ringing. This is reflected in the high levels of skill of a proportion of our members, and is a tremendous asset.
  • We have very few ringers aged 25-50 and the biggest group is 60-70.
  • Respondents ring on average, 10 times a month. This represents a really keen membership, giving a great deal of commitment.
  • The top choice for the role of the District is “raising the standards of ringing”. (q12). Whilst this is implicit in what we do, it is not specifically addressed.
  • The favourite forms of learning currently used by members, are the ones which don’t require travel.  The District caters for them somewhat by encouraging a culture of special monthly practices, and there were a number of favourable comments about these.
  • If the majority of novices want to learn at home, then the District should explore how their experience  could be improved. Eg by giving more training in Conducting, and training in how to run good practices to assistant captains. Anecdotally it was stated that once someone is a Tower Captain, a suggestion of training is perceived as an insult. Beforehand, however, they would be keen.
  • The missing age groups (25-50) are generally very busy people, less likely than other age groups to be able to ring multiple times a week, so they will need excellent teaching in order to progress.
  • Many people begin, or restart, ringing in retirement. (q9). They need excellent teaching and plenty of rope time in order to progress (anecdotal)
  • 37 of the 88 respondents rated themselves as being able to ring “One or two methods” or less. This is a very significant proportion (42%) who are not specifically planned for by the District.
  • People who can ring “one or two methods” are doing much less ringing, and are much less likely to ring away from home. (q4 and q11). And yet, they are the ones who really need to get plenty of rope time in order to progress
  • Far from being an “elite”, Surprise ringers are doing the most ringing, and are very much more likely to ring regularly at another practice night. This means it appears to be in the District’s and Towers’ best interests to create more surprise ringers.
  • There is strong demand for training in Conducting and Putting Right. This is perceived as being difficult to learn (anecdotally).
  • 19 respondents have taught learners.
  • A breakdown of skills against starting date shows that for respondents who started ringing after 1980, significantly fewer are Surprise Ringers (see last table in report, q1 vs q9). There may be many causes for this, but if we wish to nurture Surprise Ringers as a District, then we may need to make more of an effort to nurture them.

The full report is here

Ringing at Lyndhurst is back to normal

C&S Bellringers ARCHIVE SITE

Bellringing at Lyndhurst is now back to normal Bellringing at Lyndhurst is now back to normal

Mary Sterry writes:

We are open again and welcome visitors to our practices.
We still have joint practices with Minstead, at Lyndhurst, on the first Thursday of the month.  We may vary what we do week by week due to low numbers and people taking holidays.  Best to contact Paul or me if you’d like to join us at practice.
Many thanks
Mary Sterry

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