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CCCBR Guidance on Returning to Service Ringing

The scene is set for a cautious return to ringing. It won’t be all the bells, it won’t be all the ringers, but it will be enough for ringing to be part of the resumption of church services and remind people which day is Sunday.

Returning to ringing is a subject dear to all our hearts. Simulators, Ringing Room and Zoom meetings are just not the same although we should applaud all those initiatives. On 12th June bellringing appeared in a list of activities which cannot take place in churches. That made us determined to find out who was advising government so that we could make our case. All the hard work being done on guidance and risk assessments is useless if the keys to the ringing room door have been taken away.

I am pleased to say we have now made a lot of progress. The people with the metaphorical keys to our ringing room doors are Mark Betson, convenor of the Church of England’s Recovery Group, and Brendan McCarthy, the Church’s Adviser for Medical Ethics, Health, and Social Care Policy. On Monday this week, Mark Regan, Phil Barnes and I had a Zoom call with them to position ringing in the church recovery plan. Note this is Church of England only initially. We intend to have similar discussions in Wales and Scotland and provide what support we can to those in other countries. Hopefully some of this guidance is useful anyway and can be adapted to local circumstances.

Our goal for the meeting was just to establish the Council as the trusted advisor to the CofE team and hence government on bell ringing. We had sent them our suite of six guidance notes, which have now been published on the Central Council website which they were very happy to approve.

Having not really considered bell ringing specifically before, they are 100% committed to making ringing part of the return of church activities. In the first instance though it must be just that. Our return will be about Sunday ringing as part of the church’s mission, not practice or self-indulgence, though they understood our longer-term desire and need to resume that as well. Mark Betson said it would be really good to get ringing going again, reminding everyone which day is Sunday, and letting the bells proclaim that the church is open. He wanted “a package of good news” to be launched together.

Brendan McCarthy was particularly cautious of any misinterpretation of the drop in the UK Government’s social distancing rule from 2m to 1m. He cited all the guidance coming to him that 2m was not sacrosanct, but that going from 2m to 1m represents a 10 fold increase in risk, and that he would remain cautious saying “Our first job is not to kill anyone.” Our return to ringing will therefore be cautious, socially distanced ringing, for a very limited period of 15 minutes, and only for services.

Mark and Brendan had meetings with Public Health England and UK Government that afternoon and this week. They promised to include ringing in the plans and coordinate with us. We advised that we would need a couple of weeks to get restarted, allowing for maintenance inspections, and they would clear such access with the Director of Cathedrals and Church Buildings. They were happy to link our Guidance Notes from the main Churchcare website where their primary Coronavirus guidance sits.

Ringing three or four bells for 15 minutes for a service is not what keeps most of us ringing. The novelty is going to wear off quite soon. It could be a long time before peals or even quarters are possible, and we won’t be able to do any teaching. However it is an essential part of the strategy for us getting ringing going again that the church values our contribution, and we have managed to get them to include us in their plans and see ringing as a positive that we want it to be. If we do not get bells ringing for Sunday service in this first phase of resumption then it will slow down later phases of opening up. It will reinforce the impression of us that some in the church have. 

We don’t know exactly which day this will be from yet, although some Dioceses have said they expect to have services after 4th July. We received specific confirmation that access to towers to check bell installations ready for ringing was approved, provided it is done safely by more than one person, socially distanced.

We therefore need to try and find ways of making this positive. Perhaps it is the opportunity to get ringing going in all those churches which rarely have their bells rung at all. It could be the start of something for those churches.

Finally I would like to thank all my colleagues on the Central Council Executive and Workgroups (SMWG in particular) who have worked very hard in the last couple of weeks (and Giles Blundell for a dose of inspiration).

The full guidance can be found here https://cccbr.org.uk/coronavirus/

Simon Linford
President, CCCBR

Published 25th June 2020

President’s Blog #11

So much has happened in the last two weeks that it is difficult to know where to start. Maybe with ringingroom appearing on BBC News – a great achievement led by CC PR Vicki Chapman, its creators Bryn and Leland, Anthony Matthews for being an eloquent ‘face to camera’ and the online participants. Mainstream media taking a genuine interest and helping to promote us.

Every now and again I post a question on Facebook and the email list which captures the imagination or the mood. Last Sunday it was a link to a list of quarter peal composers, which did not need studying for long to see that it was 99.9999% male. Ringing starts off with 50:50 male/female recruits, the Youth Contest looks about 50:50, university ringing is relatively balanced. But when you look at tower captains, conductors, composers, people asked to call a touch on a tower grab – the imbalance kicks in. If anyone doesn’t think that’s an issue, read some of the impassioned posts in that string, which hit 150 responses in a day (now 194, but wandering). There are even performances on ringingroom which have female ringers on the front bells! Julia Cater is leading a project to establish the scale of this subconscious bias and see what we can do about it. She is in the research phase and keen to hear from anyone who would like to contribute.

Great ideas come to us from all quarters. Quilla Roth in Washington emailed me a spreadsheet of all the training webinars she had found, with a suggestion that we publish an index of them. With quick work from Web Editor Mark Elvers, and a ring around of the producers of all the pieces, we got the Index published within a week of Quilla’s email. There are so many good webinars now, and more being produced all the time. ART, Lewisham District, Cambridge District and the St Martin’s Guild are particularly active. One positive of lockdown at least. https://cccbr.org.uk/youtube-index/

At the end of the Brumdingers practice each week we give a chocolate medal to whoever has made the greatest contribution to the practice that week. My virtual chocolate medal this week goes to Laura Goodin, for taking the initiative to organise the first of what may be many Plain Bob Doubles clinics on ringingroom. She recruited teachers, helpers and students via the Take-Hold Lounge, and from reading comments after they were great.

James Ramsbottom of the V&L Workgroup produced a guide to using ringingoom https://cccbr.org.uk/2020/06/07/ringing-room-a-users-guide/ All the online platforms are contributing to helping keep ringers together, and enabling some even to make progress.

Leaving most of this Blog until finishing a very interesting Zoom session with the Guild of Devonshire Ringers has left me facing a small hours finish. (I have promised Will copy by the time he wakes up tomorrow.) It was great to discuss the Strategic Priorities with them – fascinating to get their views for instance on the place of call changes in the overall mix. I am sure that we have to get a culture where ringing good rounds and call changes is a perfectly acceptable target. We are putting people off. One person on a Zoom I had with the South Walsham ringers last week said “if I could go back to my band post lockdown and say ‘all we need to do is ring call changes well’ they will love me forever.”

Call changes then had a major feature in last week’s Ringing World and the Accidental ringer blog covered the subject, following the discussion in virtual South Walsham. If you don’t follow the Accidental ringer it is always a good read and her blog on Strategic Priority 5 is here

https://dingdong887180022.wordpress.com/2020/06/03/strategic-priority-5-if-you-were-forced-to-choose/

Along with a trip to Bromyard last week that is the last of the Zoom bookings I have in my diary. I have learned a lot from people I have talked to who I might not otherwise have ever met, and appreciate the interest they have shown in the Council and its work.

More guild and associations have held their AGMs using Zoom. Furthering my research into how to run AGMs I joined the ODG for theirs and can report that it was a very professionally run show (I managed to do all the ironing as well but they didn’t know that!). The Council’s AGM is on course for September and Secretary Mary Bone is working very hard on assembling the paperwork. She will start getting nervous as I adopt my lastminute.com approach to all the things that seem to have my name next to them. End of the month really does mean that. Don’t panic Mary!

A couple of weeks ago I wrote 1000 words (Blog length) for a Newsletter if anyone else has space to fill? Would Newsletter Editors welcome a string of material from Workgroups or are you pretty self sufficient? It couldn’t be particularly timely but it might be possible to serve up some articles once a quarter or so for general use. Is there a Newsletter Editor mailing list or group?

Last week was ‘Volunteer Week’. (Who makes these up? Today is ‘World Oceans Day’ btw). I saw Exeter Cathedral’s bellringers featured in a Volunteer Week piece, Birmingham and Worcester Cathedrals made a point of mentioning the value of their bellringers in their Volunteers Week releases and I am sure others did too. It is sometimes difficult for the ringers of these ‘bigger’ towers to become part of the church community, but it pays dividends.

Monday 1st June turned into ‘National Handbell Day’, overshadowing World Reef Awareness Day in the national consciousness. Lockdown restrictions enabled non family handbell bands to assemble in the open air, armed with sun cream and hand sanitiser. My excursion to Great Barr park for some Cambridge Royal didn’t result in a post on Bellboard, but others did, and seven handbells peals were rung in the first week (the Page household becoming a hotbed of activity).

Simon Linford
President, CCCBR

President’s Blog #10

Who would have thought that seven hours of virtual Council meetings could be enjoyable? Such was the variety of discussion and number of people involved last Sunday that it was no hardship, and really quite a nice day in. The ‘to do’ list is rather more frightening but at least it is shared widely.

Four new faces joined our meetings for the first time. Dickon Love I mentioned last time, and gave a very interesting (and professional) presentation on the Dove development plans, while Colin Newman and Ian Roulstone (see blogs passim) took the opportunity to get input into the schools, youth groups and university work. Then Mark Regan contributed to Council work for the first time. I have asked Mark to establish an as yet unnamed Workgroup to develop strategic relationships with the Church, heritage and funding bodies. He brings lots of contacts with organisations such as the Church Building Council, NHLF, Arts Council, DACs, Cathedrals, etc, and is already helping on a number of initiatives.

One participant in that and many recent Zoom calls is no longer with us. My constant lap companion Not Sherman (so called because we already had a cat called Sherman and this wasn’t him) shuffled off this mortal coil. He had become a social media star in his own right and will be missed by all his fans.

This isn’t a great time to be in any bell related business although there was good news this week in that the CofE has allowed opening of churches to contractors, which should enable bell work to resume. And while on the subject of bell work, the deadline for nominations for the Westley Awards for bell maintenance is 31st May – this is particularly aiming to recognise the development of skills in belfry work (search on google if you didn’t see the link).

The Surrey AGM was much trailed on social media and congratulations for doing it. There is a recording on their website which is worth watching by any association contemplating such a meeting. My only comment was that CCCBR was spelt CCCRB on the slide!! But at least you have elected good CC Reps who I am sure will be making an active contribution.

I am writing this watching the RSCM’s Zoom discussion on how to keep church music alive. In many ways their problem is greater than ours. There were some high-quality bookcases behind the speakers – clearly curated specially for camera. Unlike my back ground which is a set of bookcases and cabinets filled with hippos. And that was on the same day that the Sunday Times published an article on the potential for large-scale permanent closure of churches.

The breadth of subject matter for ringing Zoom meetings and talks seems to be increasing as organisers run out of training material. The Worcester Cathedral ringers kindly invited me to their weekly Zoom practice last week to talk about the Central Council and their place in it (and yes the audience was the same size at the end as the beginning), and I have another couple of gigs booked in. If anyone else has got to the point of needing to find external speakers I am more than happy to give what is quite a personal view of the Council, and take feedback from the coal face.

Lots of these invitations to join people or to think about different things come as a result of people saying “I read your blog and…” That is a great motivator for continuing to write them, along with the challenge of introducing surprising words! Just wait for this week’s.

Top entertainment was the Leicester Guild’s Monday night Bristol Maximus extravaganza marking the 70th anniversary of the first peal thereof, which was rung by a local Leicester band. Garry Mason gave an excellent talk about the peal and its ringers, which was followed by a gallant attempt to demonstrate quite how difficult it is to ring Bristol Maximus on ringingroom.com with a hand-picked 11 plus one stand-in who happened to be spotted lurking in the churchyard. “Let’s just ring four leads!” he said.

Chris Mew has retired from his very long-standing role as the CC’s Safeguarding Officer. He may well have been in post from the time subject first came to prominence and was responsible for all the Council’s guidance papers, as well as maintaining close contact with the Church’s safeguarding hierarchy. Chris’ contribution to Council work is far greater than just this and hopefully it won’t be too long before we can thank him appropriately. Chris has handed over to Ann White and Dave Bassford, who will share the role.

The other day out cycling, Charlie asked me one of her random questions – “Dad, how is your mind organised?” Tricky. I know how I recall methods though. I see a complete half line as a picture in my head, and in spliced I can quickly recall those pictures. Eleanor says that where I seem to have a neatly indexed filing cabinet she has a lucky dip bag. I asked in the PPE Facebook group what other people see and pretty much established that all our minds work differently.

I have finally worked out why there are two CCCBR Facebook groups. One isn’t a Group it’s a Page! Duh.

Plans for the Birmingham University of Bell Ringing have taken a leap forward with the identification of a site we can have, and the Leader of the Council telling his planning team to ‘make it happen.’ There are a few hurdles left of course, and a lot of money to find, but the plan published in The Ringing World a few weeks ago could yet come to fruition.

I am looking forward to the first YouTube competition finishing this week. 24 entries in so far including two handbells touches. Bostin’!

Simon Linford
President, CCCBR

CCCBR President’s Blog #9

I used to play golf on a course where the 15th hole was tantalising close to the club house. I usually wanted to stop at that point – I was tired, I was probably approaching 100 shots, and had resorted to using the lake balls in the bottom of my bag. Basically 18 holes was too long.

If the concept of peals being 5000 changes had never been instigated, what length of ringing would we set for our upper target of performance? I asked this question online last weekend and it got some fascinating responses. Quite a lot of people suggested something around the 3000 changes or two hour mark – long enough to get sustained good striking, but short of the fatigue zone.

It wasn’t an original question. Albert York-Bramble raised it in The Ringing World in 1955, the same year he founded his ground-breaking, and short-lived, “College of Campanology”. He advocated 3000, although the reasons at the time were based on needing to prevent the general public opposing excessive noise from church bell towers in the days before sound control.

No one could claim excessive noise from a church bell tower at the moment! Coming up to nine weeks without ringing ☹. The primary outlet for releasing our ringing urges, ringingroom.com, is surging in popularity (an urge surge?). It passed 1000 users a day last week, and its developers, Bryn and Leland are working hard. I was surprised to be name-checked in a fascinating podcast interview with Leland which can be found (along with others) here. If you listen to it you will learn why the Brumdingers’ motto is now #embracethechaos …

It was of course particularly disappointing not to be able to mark VE Day with bells. That was such a good opportunity to provide a soundtrack to national celebration. I hope you heard the Funwithbells Podcast that was recorded specially for VE Day – it has 30 ringers telling the story of bells in the war, and is extremely interesting. I was pleased to be able to read a letter the President of the Council wrote to The Ringing World, apologising to the public that after five years of no ringing the ringers should be forgiven for being a bit rusty!

There are more and more people making progress on handbells who would not have done so without lockdown. Young ringers Toby Hibbert and Kate Jennings rang a quarter of Bob Minor in ringingroom.com within a month of taking up virtual handbell ringing, and the Read family in Jersey enabled Hannah and William to ring their first in hand (real bells) for Jersey’s Liberation Day.

Back in the virtual world, one of the young ringers I am teaching handbell ringing to explained “ringing two is easier than ringing one because if there’s a problem with the internet both your bells are late by the same amount.” Not sure I quite followed that but it was positive thinking from a 10 year old!

Graham John posted a wonderful photograph of stacks of motion controllers being mailed out to budding online handbell ringers. Unfortunately this is not going to last long because the controllers that work best are discontinued – the manufacturer must be intrigued by this late sales blip!

Rebecca Banner and her son Dan made a bellringing simulator game in Roblox, the online gaming platform. Apparently they are working on something much more complicated aimed at teaching non ringers to ring! Sounds like an entry for the ART Awards if that one comes off.

Who wants to know about insurance? Of course you do! Once a year SMWG hosts a meeting with Ecclesiastical Insurance, which insures most churches in which we ring. This year’s call was via Zoom, robbing me of a trip to Gloucester. We are fortunate that Marcus Booth at Ecclesiastical is a ringer, and he has now been joined by another ringer, Becca Meyer, as a graduate trainee (great minutes Becca!)

The launch of the YouTube competition exceeded expectations. I was actually a bit nervous about it but with a small team comprising Neal Dodge, Simon Edwards and Ros Martin, and various levels of risk assessment and management, we got it launched. Entries are starting to come in for the first category – Best Striking on 6 bells.

Talking of YouTube videos, the Council’s Comms & Marketing team rushed out a short video to explain why bells are silent, in response to a suggestion on Facebook.  If you have a route to a local church, parish or village/town website please can you try and get this posted there?

Roger Booth has released the first four (maybe five by now) of his video tutorials on using Abel. I watched the first two and was amazed how little of Abel’s capabilities I actually use. The first one can be found here.

In the same week that the Council’s Guidance note on ringing and COVID-19 was published, lots of ringers watched a live streaming of the funeral of Andrew Stubbs, a well-known ringer who made an enormous contribution to ringing across multiple fields. The coronavirus took Andrew from us, and ringing will be the poorer for it.

I am really enthused that we are continuing to attract ringers with skills and talent to help with key initiatives. One of the two latest to step up to the plate (another next time) is Dickon Love, who becomes a Dove Steward, bringing his immense energy for ringing to the role. In the words of the Dove team he will “be leading the project to migrate Dove onto new technology and will be seeking opportunities to make the Dove data more widely used and appreciated.” When I asked my daughter Charlie why she thought the database of towers was called Dove, she said “is it because a Dove can fly over towers and see where they all are?”

Cripes, I have had to bump seven things onto Blog #10 as I have hit my word limit.

Simon Linford
President, CCCBR

SUMMARY OF CURRENT CHURCH GUIDANCE AND CC ADVICE ON REDUCING COVID RISK IN TOWERS

Ringing and chiming

  1. Ringers should not enter the church or tower for chiming, ringing or any other
    purpose under any circumstances unless they are the one “appointed person” for
    that church as defined by the guidance from their Diocesan Bishop.
  2. Not more than one bell should be rung under current church guidance and only by the “appointed person”.
  3. Care should be taken to ensure all clock hammers and any external chiming
    hammers are pulled off before either chiming or ringing.
  4. Always refer to both Church of England and local Diocesan guidance for more detail.

Hand hygiene
For those who are “appointed persons” and wish to chime or ring a single bell:

  1. Sanitizer should be applied to the hands and allowed to dry fully before and after ringing activities.
  2. No other substance than hand sanitizer should be applied to the hands before ringing, including spitting on or licking the hands

Maximum numbers of people in a ringing room

  1. No person other than the appointed person should enter the tower at any time and especially during chiming.

CC Executive
May 11th 2020

Additional Information

A detailed analysis from Dr Philip Barnes and Dr Andrew Kelso is available to download.

This document seeks to provide information and advice for ringers and those responsible for bell towers regarding Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and what issues ringers and church authorities should consider in responding to changes in Government guidance as we start to ease the current lockdown. It is focused on the situation in the Church of England, which is responsible for the vast majority of churches with bells hung for ringing. While the specific advice from leaders of other churches and in other countries may vary, the basic issues for ringers and ringing are the same wherever we ring.

Virtual VE Day 75th Anniversary Celebrations at St. Michael’s Basingstoke – 8th May 2020

Taken from https://www.basingstoke.gov.uk/ve-day

To comply with the COVID-19 restrictions and the government’s advice on social distancing, this year’s VE Day 75 anniversary celebration will still take place from 8 to 10 May but with personal commemorations in people’s homes, rather than the previously arranged public events.

Even though we cannot mark this significant day as we had planned, it is so important to remember the sacrifice, courage and determination shown during World War Two by those who served in the Armed Forces, those who worked tirelessly in shops, factories, shipyards and farms, and by thanking those who kept the country safe – such as ARP wardens, police officers, doctors, nurses, firemen, local defence volunteers and others – on the Home Front.

The Mayor of Basingstoke and Deane will lead the VE Day 75 Anniversary commemorations to thank those who gave so much during World War Two on Friday 8 May.

Cllr Diane Taylor will be marking the VE Day 75 through a number of videos on the Mayoral and borough council social media channels, including Facebook @BasingstokeMayor and Twitter @BasingMayor, throughout the day.

‘Ringing Out for Peace’ – a previous recording of St Michael’s Church bells

Our silent church bells during Coronavirus

Latest update on the CCCBR website – 8th May 2020

We have received many requests to ring church bells in support of acknowledging key workers across the UK but given the need for social distancing and non essential travel, as well as churches being shut, this has not been possible.

The short clip below explains why.

Please fee free to share across your networks and if you have any further queries, please do get in touch.

Vicki Chapman
CCCBR PRO

COVID-19 and ringing Central Council position statement May 5th 2020

It is expected that the UK Government will announce plans for a gentle easing of the current lockdown on Sunday May 10th and ringers have already been asking if that means they may return to ringing as normal. The key consideration at all times must be the safety of individual ringers, others with whom they ring and those with whom they live or may come into contact.

We do not know what the Government will propose but it is clear that, as lockdown is gradually eased, the re-opening of sections of the economy will be a priority and major restrictions on the activities of all of us will remain in place for a significant period. Government and public health teams working with others will be maintaining a very close watch on new cases and hospitalization of people with COVID-19. Ways of tracking of where such patients have been and tracing of all of their contacts will be key. All of this will take time to put in place.

The Central Council’s guidance to ringers is that currently it is too early for any return to ringing and that the current suspension of all ringing of any kind should remain in place. This includes chiming of single bells and the use of Ellacombe chimes. We will be sharing this guidance with the Church of England and ringing societies and where possible with other bell owning organisations.

Over recent weeks Dr Phillip Barnes, a recently retired NHS Consultant and Medical Director as well as a member of the CC Executive, has been reviewing the emerging scientific and medical evidence about COVID-19 and what it means for the safety of ringing. The key issues which affect the safety of ringing are the physical environment of towers including access to ringing rooms, the space between ropes, how to maintain hand hygiene in towers and the numbers of people in a restricted space for a relatively long period of time. Even if churches reopen, the environment in towers is very different.

This evidence review is being published online this week via the Central Council website and an article will appear in next week’s edition of The Ringing World. Guidance on how it might be possible to restart ringing and what restrictions and precautions would be needed to do so are an integral part of this work.

The evidence and guidance will be reviewed formally at least monthly as well as in the light of any significant developments. We are all as keen as anyone to get back to ringing as soon as possible, but that must only occur when it is completely safe to do so.

SIMON LINFORD
Dr PHILLIP BARNES
For and on behalf of the CC Executive.

CCCBR President’s Blog #8

Quizzes, coffee mornings, Zoom pub sessions, ringingroom practices – ringers are trying to retain at least some sense of normality. In the absence of practical ringing, more and more associations are running online training sessions, with topics around learning and construction of methods being particularly popular. My online production for the St Martin’s Guild this week is going to be called “Why do we need bobs?”  I have even cut my own hair specially (it’s not a bob).

Another blog, another new Workgroup. In Blog #7 I announced the formation of a group focusing on University ringing. Now it is the turn of schools and youth group development. The aim here is not just about recruiting young ringers, but about how we work with schools and youth organisations to embed bellringing in their own programmes so they become an ongoing source of recruits. The Workgroup members all either work in schools, have introduced ringing into schools, or are involved in association young ringers groups. I am very pleased that Colin Newman has agreed to lead, only six months after I started the recruitment process in the beer queue at last year’s College Youths dinner!

Another activity that is underway is the development of a couple of new residential courses. I have never been on one myself, but their popularity and demand is unquestioned. Tim Hine is working on these, and has made a particularly good start on the Lancashire course. Yorkshire is next. The intention is to go for the four-day residential style, and avoid clashing with established courses. The focus on the north of England is in response to the location of the current residential courses (Hereford, Bradfield, Essex), however it has been pointed out that Hereford is four hours from Cornwall and something in the south west would be welcome. We had better have three! (Imagine if we could learn to ring 60 on 3rds – I might go on that myself.) That’s not out of the question – it just needs people to help doing them as they are mammoth undertakings.

This Friday I will be launching a YouTube competition online and via The Ringing World. 80% of UK internet users accessed YouTube in 2019. One of the Brumdingers taught herself to ring down by looking on YouTube. Ringing content is however variable so part of the hope for this competition is to drive better content, or at least identify the best stuff. Between now and Christmas we will have a monthly competition to identify or submit the best YouTube clips of a particular genre, whether for striking, recruitment, training, or just plain extraordinary. Proper judges, symbolic prizes (“The prize is small, the honour great”)

I talked about ringingroom a fortnight ago but this week Handbell Stadium gets the spotlight. Handbell Stadium is brought to us by Graham John, a Jedi of the handbell world. Graham’s platform is aimed at handbell ringers with motion sensors and has already produced a quarter peal of Yorkshire Major that complies with all the requirements of the CCCBR Framework for Method Ringing. Graham is also organising handbell practices which could have the effect of really bringing on some people’s handbell ringing. My motion controllers have now arrived 😊so a larger audience will be able to witness my handbell shortcomings.

V&L’s Recruitment and Retention workshop that was run on the Sunday of the ART Conference is going to be made available for others to run. It is well worth having a look at, especially as recruitment and retention are going to be the order of the day when ringing returns. Details will be distributed soon.

Roger Booth has released the first four (maybe five by now) of his video tutorials on using Abel. I watched the first two and was amazed how little of Abel’s capabilities I actually use. The first one can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rm22YvuVzNM

The group working on the mobile belfry meets weekly on Microsoft Teams. The aim is to have something much more transportable than the Charmborough Ring or Lichfield Diocesan Mobile Belfry, but which will be capable of being erected in under an hour, and still give a good ringing experience. This is Mobile Belfry 2.0. Oh and it needs to cost nearer 40k than 50k. The favoured design has the belfry already erected but on its side on the trailer for transport, erected by way of a hydraulic ram that will push it to the vertical.

We have given up any thought of having a full Council Meeting in September. We had abandoned the Roadshow element a few weeks back but now we also know that the Council Meeting itself will need to be virtual. That will be a challenge, but if Jacob Rees-Mogg and the House of Commons can do it then I am sure we can. The Ringing World AGM will still be part of that.

Graham John continues to manage the official CCCBR Methods Library.
https://cccbr.github.io/methods-library/index.html?fbclid=IwAR0dbpl5VxmQo2UywFek6VZTe4LQe9Z0CF8CS37tYDC_wJpNVfFDcuF1g0s
In a sign of the times all the new methods reported this week were Minimus methods, just showing that ringers are making the most of limited opportunities! You will see on that site that it links to https://complib.org/ – if you have not discovered Complib, it is a constantly evolving resource that provides in depth method and composition information.

I am sure most of us are crossing things out of our diaries, or not even opening our diaries at all. Peals, tours, striking contests, outings, dinners – collectively thousands of hours of organisational effort is being laid waste. Spare a thought for hard working organisers of ringing and hope that when ringing returns they will retain the enthusiasm for organisation on which we all rely.

Simon Linford
President, CCCBR

CCCBR President’s Blog #7

I would be flattering myself if I thought anyone missed the arrival of my blog every other Saturday. One or two might have thought “ah I knew he wouldn’t be able to keep up a two-weekly blog”, and a few others who would have blamed t’interweb. Well actually ‘publication date’ has just moved so that arrival on social media, and publication in The Ringing World, are closer together.

When I was an eager young bell ringer, in the ‘Olden Days’ according to my daughter, The Ringing World hitting the doormat on a Thursday, folded into three and in a paper sleeve, was something I looked forward to. I still look forward to reading it of course, but I also have so many more sources of information, which differ in speed and quality (like peals).

A difficulty shared by all ringing organisation secretaries is how you get information to absolutely everyone who might find it interesting. I have to use four different communication channels just to get to 10 young Brumdingers! Although to be fair, one of those is voice. I don’t really know who doesn’t get this blog, and each fortnight I get a few new people saying “I have just seen your blog.” Please let me know if you haven’t read this.

Not having ringing on Easter Sunday was almost unprecedented. When ringing was stopped in the early war years was Easter Sunday an exception I wonder? We are still getting people asking whether they can ring just one bell or go as a family and not bump into anyone else, but not to put too fine a point on it, it would actually be against the law (in England anyway) – if going to ring doesn’t pass one of the four tests it should not happen. We have to wait for the official guidance to change.

Ringingroom.com has become a source of much focus. This virtual ringing platform, that looks and feels a bit like Abel but with different people on each bell, has been developed by Bryn Reinstadler and Leland Kusmer and has already got a lot of followers and performances vying for attention on Bellboard. A good introduction was published in last week’s Ringing World. It seems that each day I log into it there are different features enabled. I have used it so far to keep my young ringers group interested, to help teach a couple of people to ring plain hunt on handbells, and have enjoyed ringing more advanced handbells with isolated friends. As I write this I see Graham John has also released a platform for handbell ringers. I need to check that out.

Some Guilds and Associations are busier than ever trying to keep members and local ringers interested and motivated. Virtual pub sessions, training webinars, Zoom workshops, are all being deployed in the interests of maintaining our ringing activities. The Council and ART are developing a webinar series, and are testing content on smaller audiences. If your local association has lost touch with you, maybe encourage things yourself as there is much that can be done. Soon there will be webinars published on YouTube, including a series on using Abel.

Do you have your Amazon purchases going through Smile yet? Smile directs 0.5% of the net value of your purchases to the charity of your choice so it can be set up to direct funds to your local association (or the Council, which is already set up in Smile). My own Amazon purchases have sent £11 to the St Martins Guild so far – that might not seem a lot but multiply it by lots of members and it’s better than nothing. It’s free money. It needs your treasurer to register the charity with Amazon Smile.

When people criticise the Central Council it is often because they don’t think it does anything and operates from some ivory tower. I keep being surprised by how much has been going on in Workgroups behind the scenes. What often goes unreported is the work of the Stewardship and Management Workgroup (SMWG) that gives advice on all sorts of (particularly technical) aspects of ringing and ringing infrastructure to ringers and other stakeholders.

Hopefully you saw an appeal from SMWG for people to join this advice-giving group. There has been a great response to far – thank you to all the new volunteers. There is still room for more so please do look at the roles and consider getting involved – see https://cccbr.org.uk/nr4smw/. We hope this will also give the group the opportunity to be proactive as well as reactive, developing courses, videos, webinars, etc. This is a time to plan!

What we wouldn’t give a top social media influencer to take an interest in bellringing, particularly a YouTuber or Instagrammer. Could someone please teach Joe Suggs or Wengie to ring? The comedian Joe Wilkinson is not a bad start – last week he tweeted “Bellringing is a really difficult thing to practice secretively, isn’t it?”, which was picked up by ringer Simon Everest and culminated in Joe saying he would learn to ring when ringing returns. Good effort Simon!

Back to CC activity, and the University taskforce has started work. Ian Roulstone is leading it and he has a team of young ringers who are either about to go to University, there already, or recently left but still active with University ringing. The brief is to develop strategies for making sure that the move into University life is not a point at which young ringers are lost, but one where young ringers develop and thrive. A logical extension to that is to also make sure the we halt the next drop off point as well, those who leave university ringing and never get back into local ringing. Ian’s intention is to let the young ringers themselves drive the project.

And finally well done Rosie Robot on ringing a course of Bob Minor. She was perhaps fortunate to ring in such a good band. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7zQhuOdKIs I look forward to following her progress.

Simon Linford
President, CCCBR

Ringing Returns campaign

For a lot of us, this hiatus in ringing has been frustrating, but it has been really great to see the efforts that some are going to to stay in touch with their ringers, to keep practicing their skills using software apps and playing virtual ringing games, and even keeping the after practice virtual pub experiences going.

Ringing Returns will be a campaign over the coming weeks and months looking at two areas:

  1. how we can make good use of the down time to learn something new so that once the restrictions are lifted we can put it in to practice by recording a performance, from call changes to peals and everything in between.
  2. how we can celebrate a return to ringing once restrictions are lifted.

Of course we don’t want this restriction to undo all the great work that has been carried out over the last few years with recruitment and training, and we want to celebrate our return to ringing in a time honoured way, by flooding the air with the sound of bells. We have been and will continue to liaise with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport to get what information we can, and make use of their support in the promotion of bellringing when the restriction is lifted.

We don’t know when the restrictions will be lifted so trying to coordinate a specific date for mass ringing is difficult, and it may be at different times depending on which continent you are, or a gradual lifting rather than full scale. The Central Council Comms & Marketing Workgroup have been considering how we could achieve that given that we don’t know when and how restrictions might be lifted.

You could also be using this time to plan a recruitment campaign so that when the restrictions are lifted, you can invite your communities to share in the celebrations. There are some great resources to help with this on the Central Council website https://cccbr.org.uk/resources/publicity-material/ and the Association of Ringing Teachers (ART) has developed a large package of recruitment and retention resources which are available to everyone at http://ringingteachers.org/resource-centre/recruitment-and-retention/recruitment-success

Look out for more ideas and information via the CCCBR website and social media, and the Ringing World.

Vicki Chapman
CCCBR Public Relations Officer

VE Day 75 Advice

The following message has been issued by Bruno Peek, organiser of the of UK’s VE Day 75 celebrations:

“I am afraid that the terrible Coronavirus emergency and consequent Government guidance means that we must advise participants to cancel or postpone the majority of the VE Day 75 community celebrations due to take place on the bank holiday weekend of 8th – 10th May. It is right and proper that people should be kept safe and healthy.

My sincere thanks to everyone who registered their events and were looking forward to celebrating VE Day 75. I know how disappointed you will be that these cannot now go ahead as planned. However, we are still encouraging solo pipers and town criers to continue to mark the occasion from a safe and suitable location.

I am hoping that all the events you have carefully planned can be moved to the weekend of 15th – 16th August when we will be able to celebrate VE Day and VJ Day, both momentous points in our history.”

Vicki Chapman
CCCBR Public Relations Officer

200 Club – Results of March 2020 draw

The March draw of the 200 Club, raising money for the Guild Training and Development Fund, was meant to take place at the Executive Committee meeting on 16th March. This was cancelled, and for reasons we all know I have been unable to do the draw at any ringing event since. I thought that the draw should take place anyway, so on Saturday afternoon my son Paul drew the numbers at home. He did suggest we live-stream it to avoid any accusations of bias, but I thought that was going a bit far – fortunately he didn’t draw my number!

The results were as follows:
Draw Date: 28/03/2020
Prize Accumulation: £60.00

Winners
First 50% £30.00 25 Nikki Brown
Second 20% £12.00 31 Wendy Ling
Third 10% £6.00 16 Graham Nobbs
Fourth 10% £6.00 27 Christine Hill
Fifth 5% £3.00 24 Marie Boniface
Sixth 5% £3.00 6 Pete Jordan

Nikki is currently living in Norway and has very kindly asked that her prize be donated to the Netley Abbey Bell Fund. Payment of the others may be delayed but I won’t forget.

Solo ringing during the Coronavirus lockdown

Message originally posted on the CCCBR website

There have been several enquiries as to whether the ringing of a single bell or a set of Ellacombe chimes should be permitted as they are only rung by one person, especially for Easter Sunday.

It is clear from the UK government that we are being asked to stay at home to help halt the spread of coronavirus and that all unnecessary journeys should cease.  It is also clear from the Church of England that all churches are to remain closed for the time being:

Staying at home and demonstrating solidarity with the rest of the country at this testing time, is, we believe, the right way of helping and ministering to our nation. Therefore, for a season, the centre for the liturgical life of the church must be the home, not the church building.”
(Letter from Archbishops and Diocesan Bishops of the Church of England to all clergy in the Church of England 27 March 2020).

We did seek explicit guidance on this point from Lambeth Palace and were referred back to this guidance, and that churches are closed as part of wider legal restrictions.”  The Central Council Executive does not think this needs to be made any clearer.

Guild 6 and 8-bell Inter-tower Striking Competitions postponed

Fellow Ringers

I am sure you that it will not come as a surprise to you that the striking competition committee have taken the decision to postpone the Guild 6 and 8 bell inter tower striking competition until later in the year. I am not in a position to offer a date at this time as we feel that we need to wait to see how things develop with the covid-19 virus and the rest of the Guild calendar for a few weeks.

We hope that you are all safe and well.

Pete Jordan

Striking competition committee convener

CCCBR – President’s Blog #6

It seems almost incomprehensible that two weeks ago I was on my way to the ART Conference. We were saying then that if it had been the following week it might have been cancelled. By Sunday evening we realised that if it had been a day or two later it would have been cancelled. Ringing has of course been turned on its head.

The Conference itself was great – full of ideas and enthusiasm. There was a strong focus on the importance of good striking and how that should form part of the learning process. Sunday saw a running of a new Recruitment and Retention Workshop which has been developed by the Volunteering and Leadership Workgroup and particularly the efforts of Matt Lawrence, Ringing Master of the Shropshire Association. It was also interesting to hear of Matt’s own success in creating a band in his home village of Lilleshall – an inspiration to those wondering how to get ringing going at their local tower. It can be done!

The evening’s ART Awards saw over £3000 of awards given in recognition of recruitment, training, learning and leadership with a wide range of nominations from around the world. Stephanie Warboys orchestrated the awards supported by judges Julia Cater and Jonathon Townsend.

The final version of the Churches Conservation Trust’s recruitment video came just as we weren’t allowed to ring any more so that campaign has had to be postponed. A shame because I was really eager to show it to people as it is one of the best recruitment videos I have seen. It manages to mix people of all ages, multi-cultural and multi-faith. It was tested on non-ringers with very positive feedback.

I joined the Comms and Marketing Workgroup’s regular Skype call and was able to explain the thinking behind some of the ‘Strategic Priority’ actions. They are now thinking about a “Ringing Returns” campaign (needs to explanation!), the creation of a YouTube channel to showcase the best examples of change ringing so all developing ringers can see what they are aiming at, the creation of a ‘Best Local Band’ competition a bit like best kept village contests which would be for local communities or congregations to recognise their bellringers, and starting to look at marketing insights for what sort of people to target (“if you like this then you might like to try bellringing”).

The Strategic Priorities which I mention quite a bit are going to start getting serialised in The Ringing World starting next week (I think).

Talking of The Ringing World, I have suggested in other media that those who are comfortable writing could sharpen their pencils and send material into The Ringing World to make up for the lack of peals and quarter peals. Whilst fresh material is preferable, there are some things I would really like to read again. I particularly remember a report of the ‘Flixton Ringing Match’. I think it was a series on ringing controversies. It was on the back page of a very old copy. Anyone remember it?

Bells in The Netherlands rang out on Wednesday night “as a sign of hope for those in need and a sign of respect for those who comfort them.” Paul de Kok posted a YouTube clip of the bells of Dordrecht Cathedral ringing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVSR8u3zh5M&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2hiy9k–ckBVyV_a_XoZbXKsxbEkjZBBOcXX5DIkoRD5jQv6MvUHm7zlE

This is not so difficult if you don’t need so many humans to do the ringing! However bell ringing in Dordrecht is about to change. Many of us have enjoyed visiting Dordrecht to ring on the excellent ‘t Klockhuys bells and enjoyed the local hospitality. Paul and his son Harm Jan are currently in the middle of a fantastic project to put a ring of 10 bells in the adjacent Groote Kerk tower. These bells, with a tenor of 17 cwt, comprise four fine 1916 Taylor bells donated by the Keltek Trust, with six trebles designed by Mathew Higby and currently being cast by Allanconi in Italy. The frame has been designed and built with local expertise (both Paul and Harm Jan are engineers) and the aim still is to have the ring ready this summer.

With no tower bell ringing going on, and handbell performances restricted to keen (and not so keen) ringing families, many have been turning to Abel, Mabel, Mobel and a range of other tools to try and satisfy their ringing urges. Miscellaneous electronic solo performances have made a brief appearance on BellBoard and may need to find another home. I have not escaped temptation. Something I have meant to ring on handbells for about 18 months will be on the agenda as soon as I am next allowed into the company of five decent and sympathetic handbell ringers.

Topics and presenters are being gathered for a regular series of training webinars to keep ringers interested and active during this shutdown. While many of those who have been ringing all their lives can manage without ringing for a bit, those who are newer to it will miss it much more. However there is still much to be explained and learned while we are isolated and learning how to use WhatsApp, Teams, Zoom, and even House Party. Look out for this over the next week or so.

I have kicked off a small team looking at developing the next generation of mobile belfry which I hinted at in my last blog. One of today’s Microsoft Teams meetings was looking at different designs, sizes of bells, transport options, costs, etc. There was no mention of buses, although a skip wagon was an option for consideration (imagine the tower is the skip and it gets lifted off and plonked on the ground, ready assembled)! Is there a ringer who is currently studying civil or structural engineering at university who would like to join the team and maybe even have the project as part of their studies? It would be an interesting opportunity for someone to get involved. Target is to have the new belfry ready for the 2021 festival season.

Stay safe everyone – ringing will be back.

Simon Linford
President, CCCBR

Bells on Sunday at St Michael’s, Southampton – Sunday 22nd March

While ‘live’ bell ringing is suspended for a while, you can still enjoy the wonderful sound of the bells at St Michael’s, Southampton, as they will be featured on BBC Radio 4’s Bells on Sunday on March 22nd.

Tune in at 5:43am, or if that’s a bit too early for you, you can listen online afterwards:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000gksz

A&P: Practices cancelled at the following towers until further notice

Following guidance received today the following towers have ceased all ringing until further notice in an effort to reduce the spread of COVID19:

Alton (All towers), Blackmoor, Bramshott, Buriton, Froxfield, Hawkley, Holybourne, Selborne, Steep, Warnford and West Meon

Other towers will be added once confirmation is received that they are also cancelling their ringing activities

Hope to see you all soon and stay well…

Steve
A&P Communications Officer

A&P: Practice cancelled at Buriton – 18th March 2020

Dear all,

In view of the government’s advice that everyone should avoid all non-essential social contact, I have decided that this Wednesday’s (March 18) practice should not go ahead with a view to possibly following the decision of other District towers and cancelling all ringing until further notice.

David Hughes,

Tower Captain

PURBROOK – St John the Baptist. No ringing for now.

It has unfortunately been decided to stop ringing, both for the Sunday service and Wednesday Evening practice, as part of precautions considered under the present worldwide Corona Virus outbreak.

Arrangements are in hand to extend the tenor bell to allow tolling from the ground floor. Normal ringing will be resumed as soon as it is thought sensible to do so.

Ringing cancellations due to COVID-19

Coronavirus: UK ringing should now be cancelled

The UK government has advised against all unnecessary social contact with immediate effect. The Prime Minister advised in a press conference of 16th March that now is the time for everyone to stop non-essential contact with others and to stop all unnecessary travel.

The Central Council has released a statement in response to the UK government. They advise that If you haven’t already decided to cancel ringing activities, it seems that now is the time to do so. The Ringing World agrees with this statement. It is hard to interpret the government’s guidance in any way other than that all planned ringing activities in the UK should now cease.


 

 

I have been made aware that ringing has been suspended at the following towers due to COVID-19 concerns:

Alton, St. Laurence, All Saints and Holybourne – all ringing suspended.

Alverstoke – all ringing cancelled until further notice.

Basingstoke, St. Michael’s – all ringing cancelled until further notice.

Blackmoor – all ringing suspended.

Bournemouth, St. John’s, St. Peters and Scared Heart – all ringing suspended.

Bramshott – all service and practice ringing until at least the end of March where the situation will be reviewed.

Brockenhurst – no ringing until further notice.

Buriton – all ringing suspended.

Catherington – ringing cancelled, but may be some limited Sunday ringing if services continue.

Christchurch Priory – all ringing suspended until further notice.

Eling – all ringing suspended.

Froxfield – all ringing suspended.

Havant – all ringing suspended until further notice.

Hawkley – all ringing suspended and the tied practices on 6-8-10th April postponed.

Hursley – all ringing suspended until further notice.

Newport – all ringing cancelled until further notice.

Portsmouth Cathedral – all ringing suspended.

Purbrook – all ringing cancelled until further notice.

Romsey – all ringing suspended until further notice.

Selborne – all ringing cancelled until further notice.

Shanklin – all ringing suspended until further notice.

Shedfield – all ringing suspended until further notice.

Southampton (St. Mary’s, St. Michael’s and Bitterne Park) – all ringing suspended.

Steep – all ringing suspended.

Titchfield – all ringing suspended.

Upham – all ringing suspended until further notice.

Upton Grey – all ringing cancelled until further notice.

Warnford – all ringing suspended.

West Meon – all ringing suspended.

Wickham – all ringing suspended until further notice.

Winchester Cathedral – all ringing suspended until further notice.

Wonston – no practices until further notice.

Portsmouth District – all District events are cancelled including the April QDM.

Winchester District – all District events and the striking competition in May are cancelled until further notice.

Please let me know via wpbells@gmail.com of any other cancellations and I will add them to this list.

Thanks

Andrew Glover

W&P Guild Webmaster

 

 

 

Masters Message – updated 17th March – Covid-19 Virus

Dear Friends

In light of the latest government information ringing should be cancelled over the coming weeks. Please continue to work closely with your incumbents and PCC with reference to their Continuity plans and the advice from the Central Council.

https://cccbr.org.uk/2020/03/16/coronavirus-covid-19-update/

In particular, think of ways that you can keep in touch with other ringers through social media, Whats-app groups, text, email etc. to provide support and help. We have many ‘senior’ memberships in the guild so please pay special attention to those who might be lonely or vulnerable.

Please take care and don’t take unnecessary risks.

Pete Jordan

Master  – Winchester & Portsmouth Guild of Church Bell Ringers. 

 


 

Dear Friends

In light of the ongoing Covid-19 situation the current C of E advice to churches can be found at the following link

https://www.churchofengland.org/more/media-centre/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-churches

At the present time there does not appear to be anything specific regarding ringing or ringers however “Churches are encouraged to complete a Coronavirus Parish Continuity Plan to ensure, as far as possible, their continued mission and ministry.”

Individual parishes may have different views on this so please can you make sure that you are in contact with your Incumbent or PCC to get the latest information regarding your tower.

As the government advice is to frequently wash hands and avoid touching your face, if you can manage to get hold of hand wipes or gel for your tower, or if your church has hand washing facilities please make use of them. I am sure that each tower will make the right, sensible decisions about additional precautions to take considering the demographics of the band, frequency of ringing and potential risks etc.

Stay Safe

Pete Jordan

Master  – Winchester & Portsmouth Guild of Church Bell Ringers. 

Coronavirus – COVID-19 – Update from CCCBR

Coronavirus – Covid-19 – Update – 16th March

New updates on the Coronavirus have been issued by the UK government today, which include avoiding any “non-essential” travel and contact with others and avoiding pubs, clubs theatres and social gatherings.  If you haven’t already decided to cancel ringing activities, it seems that now is the time to do so.

We must all ensure that we are following the most up to date advice from the Chief Medical Officer (or overseas equivalent) with regard to the Covid 19 outbreak.  Of course the Central Council is not in a position to provide professional advice, however there are some simple guidelines to consider to ensure that we adopt sensible precautions and support each other through a period of rapid change and uncertainty.   The advice is changing almost daily and the latest messages concern potential restriction of movement of people over the age of 70 in the coming weeks, if not sooner.

The demographics of the ringing community has a large proportion who fit in to the over 70 year old and/or medically vulnerable category, and ringers can be quite stubborn when it comes to continuing ringing, insisting that we “keep calm and carry on”.  However, under the current circumstances, we have a duty to be responsible for ourselves and towards others we ring with.  If you fit into a category that has been advised to socially distance yourself, please heed that advice.  If not for you, then to help prevent putting other people at risk.

Having said that, socially distancing yourself can create a sense of isolation, and we must ensure that we maintain contact with our ringing friends, and offer any help and support where we can.  Please check in with those who are advised to stay home, phone them for a chat to ask how they are, drop them a quick text, Whatsapp or social media message to let them know they haven’t been forgotten.

If you find yourself self isolating, consider how you might get your ringing fix if not on the end of a rope.  There are many apps for phones and computers that you can utilise to learn methods, practise listening skills and so on. There’s a multitude of YouTube videos on various aspects of ringing, ringing up and down, rope splicing and many other tower tasks that need doing.  Get out some good old paper and pencil to write out methods, learn the place notation, write out touches etc  – that’ll keep you busy for hours!  Keep in touch with friends on the various bellringing social media communities, maybe even start one of your own.  Get that tower website up to date.  Get around to writing up last year’s tower AGM minutes.  Plan what you are going to do once the restrictions have been lifted, maybe organise a reunion.

Keep up to date with the latest advice from the government, ensure that you support each other, keep calm and keep safe.

———————————————————————————————————————————–

Many people are concerned about the effects of the current Coronavirus outbreak and what impact that has on us and our ringing activities.  Whilst the CCCBR cannot offer any professional medical advice, we would recommend that you adopt sensible precautions and follow the advice from the Chief Medical Officer.

Information about the virus, signs and symptoms can be found at https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/ but there are some very simple guidelines to follow during every day activities:

Do

  • wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • always wash your hands before and after ringing
  • use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards or use sanitiser gel
  • try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell

Don’t

  • do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean
  • lick or spit on your hands before catching hold of a rope, use other methods of increasing grip e.g. liquid chalk

We all have a duty to adopt sensible precautions to protect ourselves, our friends and families and to follow the current advice.  Sources of information for the UK can be found here:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/

https://111.nhs.uk/covid-19

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/coronavirus-covid-19-list-of-guidance

Other territories may also have regular advice updates for which territorial associations may be able to provide further guidance.

Vicki Chapman
CCCBR Public Relations Officer

STOP PRESS!! – Guild Exec meeting on Sat 14th March postponed

Message from the Guild Master

Dear Friends

After further consideration and reviewing the content of the agenda, the Principle officers and I have decided to postpone the EC meeting on Saturday until a future date. The covid-19 risk is probably low but there is still a risk and your safety is paramount.

The only time critical item on the agenda is the approval of the reports for the handbook. These have been distributed to you by email with the EC papers and we would ask that you review them and if you have any comments / questions that you email Adrian by midnight on Monday 16th March. If we don’t hear from you by that time we will assume that you are ‘in favour’ of acceptance of the reports.
The reports are proposed by Pete Jordan and seconded By Adrian Nash.

Any other business on the agenda can be deferred to the next meeting or covered outside the meeting.

I will discuss with those who have information agenda items if they would like Adrian to send information to you by email or defer to the postponed meeting date. At this time I am unable to confirm when this will be however.

I know that this is not an ideal situation but I am sure you will understand in light of the current pandemic.

With Best Regards

Pete Jordan
Master  – Winchester & Portsmouth Guild of Church Bell Ringers

Bournemouth St John’s, Surrey Road. 8-Bell Practice. Tuesday 10th March 2020

This Tuesday, the 10th March 2020,  the 8-bell practice will focus on Grandsire Major.

Two things to say:

1         We will need help!

2         We will also be ringing everything from rounds & called changes upwards, so all abilities welcome as usual.

Penelope Samuel

Contact Penelope Samuel